Notes

[NI0005] [Notes by Dawn Banks]

Bruce died young of Acute lymphocytic leukemia. He nearly died shortly after being diagnosed, did poorly with the chemo, went into a couple month remission, then went downhill quickly, about 4 months after being diagnosed.

[NI0009] Vernon worked for Mountain Bell, and upon retiring, moved himself and Opal to Sun City, Arizona.

[NI0016] [Notes by Dawn Banks]

William Oakley Banks says that his father was a bank examiner, which was a successful career for him until the depression hit. Afterward, he moved his family back to the Boot Ranch in Sundance.

There, he was acquainted with a gentleman who found some success in state politics (elected governor?). This gentleman apparently provided patronage work for William Earl in the Cheyenne area.

[NI0017] A postcard from Laura Sue to Anna [Blankenhorn] Gordon (postmarked Aug 25, 1924, New Castle, Wyo) read:

Dear Anna,

Perhaps this will give you some sort of an idea of Sundance. Sundance Mountain can not be seen on this picture, it is taken from the opposite side. I'm sending the twin a view which shows Sundance Mt. I'm going to Newcastle to-morrow.

This climate makes me terribly sleepy all the time. I fear I shall get fat. It is very hot during the day but very cook at night. So far the time has pasted [sic] very quickly but school doesn't begin until Sept. 15th.

I'm taking a regular vacation in the mountains. The people are all very nice I've met. Most everyone or rather so many of men around here are Shriners. They have a Star chapter here too.

Oh yes, and there also must be Klansmen cause I hear people speaking to that effect.

I'll write to you soon. Love, Sue

[Notes by Dawn Banks]

If we take the date of the postcard, and Laura Sue's birthdate seriously, it would appear that she was planning doing something with school in Sundance at the age of 25, probably as a teacher, as other records indicate that she graduated from Pine Island High School in 1918.

I must ask dad why she moved from Pine Island to Sundance (seems like an odd choice otherwise).

[NI0018] Eleanor Banks Vines A. O. (Oakley) Banks
Sundance, Wyoming Boot Ranch
283-1376 Sundance, Wyoming

A. O. Banks was an early pioneer of Crook County, Wyoming. He established a sizable ranch, ten miles south of Sundance, nearly one hundred years ago.
BIO

Albert Oakley Banks (1858-1941) Rancher and Politician was born February 14, 1858, son of Joseph Banks, a fisherman, at, the family home, near St. Johns, Nova Scotia. His mother, Dorothy Payson, was a direct descendant of John Alden. She was widowed at an early age and left to rear a large family. Her husband Joseph lost his life at sea. Albert Oakley was the second of three sons, the first was Will. His brother, Steven, along with several sisters, were all born at the home.

Oakley, as he was always called, attended the district schools in Nova Scotia. In 1879, as a young man, Oakley left Nova Scotia for Boston and vicinity. During his apprentice jobs there, he met the poet, Ralph Waldo Emerson. He, sometimes, helped Emerson in his asparagus fields. Oakley worked in this area, on various farms for five years. While living here, Oakley developed a lung condition and his doctor advised him to go "WEST."

In 1884, Cakley gave into the wanderlust and boarded a train for as far west as he could go. He arrived in Fort Collins, Colorado, some days later. He remained here for a few months. He made preparations to travel to. the Black Hills. He purchased a covered wagon, supplies and a team of horses. Fort Collins was an outfitter's paradise and he was soon well-prepared. He was accompanied, on the trip, by his brother Will's wife, Emma and their small child. Will Banks was already on a homestead, in Sundance, Emma was also pregnant on the trip and later her baby was one of the first white children born in Sundance.

The trip was uneventful until they arrived in the vicinity of a large military fort, known as Fort Laramie, Wyoming. The Indians had been giving General Custer and the settlers a worrisome time so the fort was placed here. As Oakley neared the fort, the military scouts rode out and escorted him in for an overnight stay. Oakley renewed some supplies, one being nice fresh bread from the bakery, which was a real treat. The next morning, the Commandant of Fort Laramie, called Oakley in and informed him that the Indians, all the way from Fort Laramie into the Black Hills, were hostile and warring. This didn't deter Oakley and he left with his party. The scouts gave him an escort for three miles out and he felt saddened when they left his wagon. However, the trip, again, was uneventful and they didn't see an Indian. It was a long, arduous trip of several hundred miles.

Oakley homesteaded a ranch 10 miles south of Sundance, in 1888. When Oakley was issued his cattle brand in the form of a cowboy boot, he named his ranch, the "Boot Ranch." The ranch was able to carry quite a few cattle and sheep. Oakley had the foresight to lease nearby forest reserve and this added. substantially, to the grazing capacity of his ranch. Oakley was a stable, astute man. He was very interested in his ranch livelihood as well as that of his neighbor. He was a man of a friendly, genteel disposition and his ranch prospered.

On November 15, 1894, Oakley married Janie Rundle Hawken. They were married at the Charles Hawken home on Black's Flat. They went by team and buggy to Spearfish, South Dakota, to spend their honeymoon. They reared 4 children - Claude, Earl, Eleanor and John, on the "Boot Ranch." When the children entered high school in Sundance, Oakley and Janie commuted from the ranch to a town house, which they had acquired, in addition to their ranch home. Their town home was on the site of the present Arrowhead Motel

Oakley was also a public spirited and progressive citizen. He was active in politics and was often consulted by the Republican party. He voted the Republican party for his entire life, He served three terms as Crook County Commissioner. He served from 1905-1908 and, again, from 1927-1928. Oakley was credited with much county road building and this stimulated the economy for the ranchers.

Oakley was a life-long member of the Masonic and Shrine Lodges of Northeast Wyoming.

He spent his last years at his beloved "Boot Ranch." He passed away July 3, 1941.

From "Progressive Men of Wyoming"

ALBERT O. Banks

Born in the busy and progressive province of Nova Scotia, Canada, there reared to the age of seventeen, then left an orphan and thrown on his own resources by the death of his father, well has Albert O. Banks, of Crook County, Wyoming, one of the prominent and enterprising ranchmen of his section, justified the hopes of his friends in his childhood by carving out of hard conditions a fortune of comeliness and graceful proportions. His life began on February 14, 1858, in the rural home of his parents, Joseph and Dorothy (Payson) Banks, residents of Nova Scotia, and highly esteemed farmers. In 1875 his father died and was buried in his native soil while his mother, a native of St. Johns, still resides in Nova Scotia. Albert O. Banks was educated in his native land and remained at home for a few years after the death of his father, working on farms in the neighborhood, when not engaged on that of his mother. In 1879 he left home and coming to Massachusetts worked on farms in that state for a period of five years. In 1884 he turned his face to the great and growing West, and made his way to Fort Collins, Colo., where he remained for a few months, at the end of which he came on to Wyoming and took up the ranch he now occupies, located about ten miles southeast of Sundance. For a few years after his settling here he worked at times in the timer at lumbering, but, since getting his ranch industry well started, he has sedulously devoted his time and energies to that, and has won, by diligence and close attention to business, a gratifying success and he has risen to a desirable place in the regard and esteem of his fellow men. He owns 560 acres of land, has a large leased tract, and has improved his possessions with good buildings, fences, etc., and brought them to a high state of cultivation by skillful farming. His principal industry is raising cattle, but he also does farming on a scale of some magnitude and by methods that embrace all that is known to the intelligent and progressive tiller of the soil. On November 15, 1894, Mr. Banks was married to Miss Jennie [Janie] Hawken at Sundance. Mrs. Banks is a native of England, but for years she has been a resident of Wyoming. They have two children, Claude R. and Earl [and Eleanor and John]. Mr. Banks is an active and zealous Republican, seeking always the welfare of his party and its proper guidance along the lines of safe and healthful progress, but not desiring for himself any of its honor.

[Notes by Dawn Banks]

William O Banks (Oakley's grandson) said that Oakley loved to tease, and pinched him mercilessly.

[NI0019] Eleanor Banks Vines Biography of Janie Rundle Hawken Banks
P.O. Box 278
Sundance, WY 82729
(307) 283-1376

Janie Rundle Hawken Banks was born August 10, 1872 at Camelford, Cornwall, England. She was next to the youngest in a family of sixteen children. At the age of twenty, she sailed from England with her parents and several of her brothers and sisters in 1892.

Two years after coming to Wyoming, she was united in marriage to Albert Oakley Banks, November 15, 1894.

She took a great interest in the Inyan Kara Community Church, which was close to the ranch.

She retained much of her English culture and was very stylish. She often wore white gloves on her shopping trips to Sundance.

Although it lacked some amenities, she was proud of her large ranch home. She was proud of her electric lights and washing machine in that early day. She also, collected fine china for her home. She enjoyed giving dinner parties for family and friends. She cooked hundreds of meals for the traveling public. The ranch was right by the county road from Sundance to Newcastle. The school teachers always boarded with the Banks's. She was an excellent wife and mother. She reared three sons - Claude, Earl, and John and one daughter, Eleanor to maturity.

She died at the ranch December 16, 1939 after an illness of three weeks. Services were held at the Episcopal Church in Sundance.

[NI0023] There is some uncertainty as to the correct spelling of her last name -- Bass or Barss.
Family tradition holds that Margaret was molested by a British Soldier names Chesley.

[Notes from Bob & Mary Beth Wheeler]

Margaret Bass was allegedly raped by Col. William Chesley, resulting in the birth of daughter Eliza Ann.

[NI0026] [Notes from Bob and Mary Beth Wheeler]

He may have had 2 wives, Lydia Alden then Elizabeth Searle

[NI0029] Daughter of Ensign Edward & Susannah (Wiswall).

[NI0031] per MAYFLOWER INCREASINGS by Susan E. Roser

[NI0036] A letter from Don Banks to Furber Marshall notes: "... one thing I found at the Archives, Boston, was a microfilm containing military records of the men who fought in the French and Indian Wars. I only had time to copy what was there on Joshua and his son Moses, our hero. It really was not anything new, but proved Dr. Banks to the right in what he wrote about the military record of Moses: his being at Fort Carillor (Ticonderoga) when Montcalm defeated the British in 1758, and at Halifax two or three years, ending his army career July 20, 1763, as I understand the enlistments given."
Moses owned Lot #193 in Granville and is listed in the Confirmation Grant of 1764. He sold this lot to Henry Munroe and moved to Wilmot. The Census of 1770 lists him as having 4 in family and the Census of 1771 as having 5, so it would appear that a child died between Moses and Richard, or else either Joseph or Benjamin, who are listed without dates of birth, should be placed there.
[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 7, Ed. 1, Tree #2053, Date of Import: May 16, 1997]

He was married twice (?) the first to Jane Spinney - who was probably mother of most of the children. It ended when she died (not sure when) then he marraied a saunders - probably related to Hannah

[NI0039] Joshua Banks, Notes by Eleanor Banks Vines

Richard's great grandson, Joshua Banks, who in 1737, had married Mary Muchmore, sought a new home in this county (meaning Annapolis County, NS) in 1760 with his family, of whom Moses was the oldest, who was then twenty-three years old. His parents died in Granville in the early years of its settlement. In 1764, the son (Moses) married Jane Spinney and when her family sought a new home in WIlmont, he removed thither where he ultimately died on his 95th birthday in 1835. His wife, having died after the birth of seven children, he married again in 1778, Judith Saunders, a sister of the late Timothy Saunders the first, by whom he had six other children. His descendants are now very numerous and many reside in Upper Wilmot and Aylesford to this date. His borther, Joshua Banks who was twelve years his junior removed to Wilmot while yet a young man and settled in Western Wilmot near Lawrencetown, where he finally died having a large family. Two of his sons were among the first settlers in the beautiful district of Clarence East, two others settled on the Wilmot Mountain not far from Port Lorne, and others elsewhere, and their descendants are also very numerous.

[NI0041] John Banks, Notes by Jim Eakins

John was a Selectman, in 1693; a Grand Juror, in 1692-93 and in 1701; and removed to York, Maine.
He built his home in the York Beach area, a mile or two away from the town and this edifice, with some additions, was still standing, but was known to be vacant, in 1975. It was rumoured, in 1976, that the town had bought the 15 or 20 acre homestead property for school purposes with intentions of renovating the old building for offices.

John Banks, Notes by Eleanor Banks Vines

John, the oldest son of Richard and Elizabeth Alcocke Banks, was born in York, in or before 1657. He apparently lived his life in that locality, as his name appears occasionally in town records. He married twice, but the name of his first wife is unknown; the second marriage was to Elizabeth Turbat of Wells. He died between Septemnber 1724 and April 1726. Elizabeth survived him, her will being dated 1737 and probated in 1738. Their children were Moses (married Ruth Weare), Hannah, Aaron, Mary.

[NI0045] Joshua Banks was the forefather of the Banks families in Clarence. He came to Granville in the early 1760’s. Joshua’s brother, Moses Banks, came at the same time [others are of the belief that Joshua followed Moses some years later]. Moses was granted Lot #93, in Granville, in 1764. Joshua did not get a Granville lot, probably because he was too young (he was only 15 years old in 1764).
In 1778, when Joshua was 29, he bought, from William Marshall, for ten pounds sterling, the eastern half of Wilmot Lot #12 (b3-p190). This land was 40 rods in width and extended north from the Annapolis River about 1000 rods to the vicinity of Sand Lake on the North Mountain. The lot crossed the Post Road where the road reaches its most northerly point in the curve about half way between Paradise and Lawrencetown. This area along the Post Road was being cleared and settled during the 1770’s and 1780’s and this is where Joshua Banks cleared the land and established his home and raised his family, being one of the first settlers in the area. [Reginald Marshall]
The family later removed from Granville to Wilmot.
It is presumed that all of their children were born in Wilmot.

[NI0046] John Alcocke, notes by Eleanor Banks Vines

Probably before 1643, John Alcocke came from England to York, Maine. His name appears June 16, 1643 when he bought a homestead in York. He lived there thirty years, acquiring other land and devoting himself to private interests, rather than public office. Between 1671 and July of 1675 he died; on the latter date administration of his estate was granted to his son, Joseph, and sons-in-law, Shubael Dummer and Richard Banks.
His wife, Elizabeth was living at this time, but was not listed among the heirs. THeir children were:

Joseph, Mary, Job, Hannah, Sarah, Lydia, Elizabeth (married Richard Banks), Samuel.

[Notes by Everett P. Inman]

Also Allcock, Allcocke, Alcott. He was a planter at York, ME as early as 1639. His servant John Smith ran away and was returned to him by court order Sep 9, 1640. He rented land of Wm. Hooke 16 Jun 1643. He was a juror in 1647. Bought land at Cape Neddicke Beach 16 Jul 1650. Submitted to Mass govt and was aptd. a sgt 22 Nov 1652. His estate was settled Mar 1675.

[NI0048] Joseph is said to have settled in Eastern New Jersey; to have joined the Loyalists; and to have died in the war.

[NI0049] RESEARCH NOTE: Gary Long has her married to John Graves (1768-1862).

[NI0052] Peter Turbat, notes by Eleanor Banks Vines

Peter Turbat is listed as a freeman in Cape Porpoise, Wells in 1652. The family, of Norman origin, was in Yorkshire, England as early as the reign of Richard I (1157-99).
He married Sarah, daughter of John and Ann Saunders of Hamptom and Wells. Peter died in 1661, survived by his wife and five children.

[NI0055] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Edna Sager notes that Stephen and his brother Oakley went out to Wyoming before 1900 to ranch there.

Photo Note: Edna Sager has photographs.

[NI0058] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Ada was eight years old at the time of her father's death.

[NI0060] [Notes by James Eakins]

Zilphia died single. She was employed as a practical nurse in Newton, Massachusetts until 1928 when she returned home to live with her neice, Mrs. Arthur Jefferson, sister of Joseph Banks. She stayed with this family until 1950 and then spent the last 12 years of her life in Northville with Mrs. Ira Bill.

[NI0061] Joseph was a Lieutenant in the Indian Wars.

[NI0071] [Notes by Everett P. Inman]

After the death of her husband, Peter Turbat, she married Daniel Goodwin of Berwick, ME. She sold land in the `Coxhall tract' 29 Jun 1687.

[NI0076] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

According to a letter from Edna R. Rater to Furber Marshall, it would appear that her husband may possibly have been Ray Vines or Raymond Lee Vines.

[Notes by Dawn Banks]

I did not realize that I even had a great aunt Eleanor until I began collecting genealogy information from my family members. Then, not only did I discover that this aunt existed (and did most of my work for me), but that she was also living.

My father's response was surprise that I didn't remember - apparently, she'd fix us something to eat whenever any of us would pass through the area on the way to the Boot Ranch. This explains everything, as I always hated that stupid ranch.

Yes, I probably met my great Aunt Eleanor, although I don't remember her. It's a shame, because I may never have another chance to meet her.

[NI0083] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Effie provided most of the information on the Zenas Smith Banks line to Bruce Banks, son of Charles Whitney Banks, who in turn passed it along to Donald Banks (1974) for inclusing in this genealogy.

Don Banks reports that Bruce Banks saw his grandmother in 1974 and he reported that her memory was failing but that this most long lived of Banks descendants was nonetheless still vigorous of heath.

[NI0102] Moses lived on the family homestead in York, Maine all of his life. In 1712 he was an envoy to the Indians to negotiate for the return of captives. He was a Lieutenant in Colonel Thomas Westbrook’s Company from 1722 through 1725 to fight the Indians.

[NI0104] [Notes by Everett P. Inman]

He lived in York, ME. He was killed by Indians while returning from church.

[NI0109] Mary was mentioned in both her father’s and her mother’s wills.

[NI0110] [Notes by Everett P. Inman]

Came to Mass. in the Confidence on 11 Apr 1638 with 1st wife, Sarah, and his three servants, Roger Easman, William Cottle, and Robert Ring. With his 2nd marriage he had children: Hester, John, Ruth, Sarah, Mary, Abigail, Joseph &Elizabeth. He returned to Weeks, Downton in 1655 and made kinsman, Richard Dole, his attorney for business in New England.

[NI0116] Elizabeth had, as step-brothers, Captain John Harmon and Colonel Johnson Harmon. John was a Captain of the 6th Company, 1st Massachusetts Regiment in 1744-45 at Louisburg. His name was known, and feared, by the Indians (for additional information see "Sylvester’s History, Volume III, Page 152").

[NI0151] From notes written by Wilhelmina Wadell Winkler and Joan Gordon

COMING TO AMERICA--- GRANDMA BARBARA MARTY BLANKENHORN

Grandma came to America with her father, her older sister, and a brother. I think their mother had died, and Grandma, at eleven, had already been working at lace making. Their father left the older children in Switzerland. I am not sure, but I think he eventually left Grandma and her sister, Ursula, whom we always called just " Auntie," in Stillwater. I don't recall any discussion of his grave so that is why I think he returned to Switzerland.

After they came to Stillwater, their father took the girls with him while he worked on a farm near Hinckley, MN. He disliked the behavior of the farmer toward the girls and left abruptly. Auntie told me once that she was surprised that Grandma was able to save some of her things from Switzerland; that she had left everything behind when their father took them away from that farm in Hinkley.

Their brother, whose name I don't know, started to work in the logging camps north of Stillwater, brobably along the St. Croix river. During one winter, he contracted pneumonia and died. Again, I don't recall any discussion of where he was buried, but sometimes we would just visit the cemetery in Stillwater where she was buried.

Auntie & Grandma began working as "hired girls" in Stillwater, and that is where grandma & Grandpa met, and I think married. Stillwater always was a point of reference for them, a place to which they came back again, but always left. We found the last house that they lived in one day after we had dinner in Stillwater, but I have not checked lately.


MRS BLANKENHORN IS CALLED
Barbara Marty, daughter of Mathias and Barbara Marty, was born in Engi, Canton Glarus, Switzerland, June 19, 1867. She passed away at her home Saturday, July 9 1939 of Heart trouble.

At the age of fifteen, together with her family, she came to Stillwater, Minnesota. There she met John Blankenhorn and to whom she married on September 16, 1889. He preceded her in death the 12th; day of last April, after more than 48 years of happy living together. Before coming to Pine Island in 1909, the family at Lake City Minnesota and Shullsburg, Wisconsin.

Surviving children are John of Pine Island, Mrs. James Gordon of Pine Island, Mrs. Susan Banks of Sundance Wyoming, Mrs. Julia Waddell of Rockville, Maryland, Jenny of Fort Seilacoom, Washington, and Florence of Bremerton, Washington, two sisters, Ursula Marty of Minneapolis and Verena Hammerli, living at the old home in Switzerland.

There are also six grandchildren: Robert, Barbara and Charlotte Blankenhorn, James and Joan Gordon, and William Banks.

Funeral services were conducted Wednesday, July 13 from the home at 1:30 and at 2:00 PM at the Methodist church, by the Reverend Charles E. Sauter. Interment was in the Pine Island Cemetery.

[NI0152] [Notes by Dawn Banks]

The Wuerttemberg Emigration Index shows three other individuals applying for emigration at the same time as Johann Frederick: "Blankenhorn, Frie M. (wid.)," who we assume to be his mother Frederica, "Ludwig Friedrich" and "Magdalena Friede."

I don't know where I got the names of John's siblings from, but the names I got ("Loiue" and "Lena") seem to be americanized versions of the names listed in the emigration records. We assume that John Frederick was "Johann Friedrich" before he left Europe.

Written by Wilhelmina Waddell Winkler and Joan Gordon

COMING TO AMERICA---JOHN FREDERICK BLANKENHORN.

The stories of Grandpa's coming to America always told of his uncle and his leaving Switzerland before coming to America.( See the obituary for John F Blankenhorn). There was always an element of quietly leaving one dark night and crossing the border, but this may be just the way I imagined it based on the thirties movies. It also included leaving to avoid army service.

Grandpa used to tell the story that when he was very young and learning the baker's trade, the apprentices would sleep in the shop on top of the dough boxes. When the dough had risen enough to upset their balance on top of it, it was time to get up and start another day.

At some point, some of the rest of the family ( his mother and brothers and sister, perhaps) came to the US.; Julia and Jennie (Dawn these are your twin Great Aunts, Julia was Wilhemmina's mother) said they found records of their departure in Stuttgart, but I do not know the details of what they found.

Grandpa eventually came to Stillwater, Minn, and began to work for some bakery. His mother lived near Staples, MN, and I think is buried near there. I do not know the details of other relatives in that area; there were others, I know, however. One of his brothers, louie, I think lived in Finlay, Ohio, and we visited him in the mid forties. Another in Manistie, Michigan.

Notes from newspaper obituary:

RITES HELD FOR J. F. Blankenhorn

Seventy-Two Year Old Resident 0f Pine Island Laid To Rest in Local Cemetery

John Frederick Blankenhorn, son of Philip and Fredericka Blankenhorn, was born in Knittlingen, Wurtenberg Germany, February 17, 1866. He passed away at his home Tuesday April 12, 1938 of heart attack.

At the age of 13 he went to Switzerland where he started his vocation as a baker.

In 1882, accompanied by an uncle, he came to United States and located at Stillwater, Minnesota. September 16, 1889 he was united in marriage with Barbara Marty; they then moved to Lake City, Minnesota where they resided for ten years.

He then owned and operated a bakery in Shullsburg, Wisconsin for ten years.

1909 he came to Pine Island where he established a bakery business from which he retired in 1928.

One son, Frederick, preceded him in death. He is survived by his wife, Barbara, one son, John of Pine Island and five daughters, Anna Gordon and Jennie of Pine Island, Florence of Bremerton, Washington, Julia of Rockville, Maryland and Susan Banks of Sundance, Wyoming. There are also six grandchildren; Robert, Barbara and Charlotte Blankenhorn, James and Joan Gordon, and William Banks, one brother, Louie, of Van Buren, Ohio; one sister, Lena Zarger, of Manistee, Michigan.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Sauter at Methodist Episcopal church on Friday, April 15 at 2:00 p. m. Interment was made in the Pine Island cemetery.

[NI0153] [Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 3, Social Security Records: U.S., SS Death Benefit Records, Surnames Beginning with B, Date of Import: Nov 30, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.111.3.21184.146]

Individual: Blankenhorn, John
Birth date: Dec 17, 1890
Death date: Aug 1963
Social Security #: 475-07-0427
Last residence: WA
State of issue: MN

[NI0159] [Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 3, Social Security Records: U.S., SS Death Benefit Records, Surnames Beginning with B, Date of Import: Nov 30, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.111.3.21184.190]

Individual: Blankenhorn, Robert
Birth date: Oct 31, 1913
Death date: Sep 1965
Social Security #: 391-05-5517
Last residence: WA 98106
State of issue: WI

[NI0169] [Notes by Dawn Banks]

The Wuerttemberg Emigration Index notes a "Frie. M Blankenhorn (wid.) & F." applying for emigration at the same time as "Johann Friedrich," "Ludwig Friedrich" and "Magdalena." The emigration date, birth dates and locations, and names seem to correspond to the americanized names and dates for the immigration of John, Louie and Lena.

The notation "(wid)" also seems to imply that she was widowed prior to this emigration, which at least gives us an estimate for Philip's death.

[NI0172] Joan Gordon, Notes by William O. Banks

Cousin Joan put this information together for our other cousin, Wilhelmina Waddell WInkler. She also sent a copy to her namesake, my sister Joan Banks Cameron. Joan Gordon got her PhD from the U of Minn in about 1951. She was or is on the faculty unless she retired. Joan Gordon was always a genius. I remember in the mid-1930s when I was 7 or 8 and she was 14 or 15, she explained relativity to me in such a way that it came back to me when I taught physics. Here's some of what she said in her letter to sister Joan:

"I tried to think of some of the stories that I used to hear. I don't think I made them up but the probably are distorted a little by the way I remember hearing them. By the time I was hearing the stories, Grandpa and Grandma Blankenhorn were older and most of the stories I heard was when I was in grade school & before I left for University.

"I was the youngest of the five cousins in Pine Island. Bill came next and then Joan then Willie Waddell. So each of us heard it from a different time frame and our parents telling us from their time frame..."her letter to Joan. Here's her story. [Story follows, included in notes for John Frederick Blankenhorn]

[NI0176] [Notes by Dawn Banks]

I found this reference in the Wuerteemberg Emigration Index. I don't remember where I got Lena's name from, but I find a Magdalena Friede travelling with Johann Friedrich (my great-grandfather), Ludwig Friedrich (I presume to be the person I otherwise recorded as "Louie") and "Frie. M. Blankenhorm (wid)," who I presume to be their mother, Frederica.

[NI0182] Samuel resided in York, Maine during the early part of his life and removed to Saco, Maine circa 1735 and settled on the Harmon Estate, which his father had acquired by marriage. He was a town officer in 1744.

[NI0251] Richard Bancks

[Compiled by J. Eakins]

The English ancestors of Richard Bancks, in spite of much research by many people, including Dr. Charles Banks, the Maine Historian, are still in considerable doubt. The difficulty would not appear to be a lack of information about the Bancks family but, rather, the impossibility of determining which of the Richards came to America.
Frederick Lewis Weis, the well-known Genealogist, in tracing the Tillinghast family gives the following: "Thomas Banckes, merchant and Alderman of London. His daughter Joan Banckes married Robert Tichborne. Their daughter, Elizabeth, married Pardon Tillinghast, Jr.". It is quite possible that Thomas had other children besides Joan, but since Mr. Weis was only interested in the Tillinghast family as she is the only one mentioned in this instance.
Several Genealogists, including William E. Chute, have pointed out another possibility: some even considering it proven. Dr. Banks was not entirely in agreement with this conjecture as the records he found did not indicate what happened to this particular Richard. Dr. Banks found: "John Bancks, who made his will in London, England, circa 1630, mentioned the children of his Uncle William Banks (wife unknown) as William, Richard (possibly our immigrant ancestor), Thomas, George, and Mary".
Dr. Banks was sure that he had identified Richard as living in the parish of Alkham, County Kent, since he came to America with his brother-in-law, Thomas Curtis, and with Abraham Preble and John Twisden, Senior, both of the same vicinity. It is not out of the bounds of possibility that his first move might have been from London to Alkham, and he may have been the same man mentioned as the son of William.
At the time of his marriage in England, Richard was listed as a tailor. Just prior to his migration there had been an epidemic in which many people died. There was also trouble in the textile industry. Being a widower, with all three of his children dead, it is not surprising that he decided to seek a new life far from the scene of his misfortunes.
Richard, the immigrant ancestor of this genealogy, came to America and settled at Scituate, in the Plymouth Colony. He took the Oath of Fidelity, in Scituate, circa 1642.
Theodore Leslie Banks (TLB) notes that Richard returned to England briefly to marry Elizabeth Curtis. TLB notes that: "In 1641 Oliver Cromwell was called upon to savagely subdue a bitter Irish rebellion. In 1642 civil war erupted in England, with Cromwell leading the rebellion against Charles I. In 1644, when Richard returned to England to marry Elizabeth Curtis, the civil war between Cromwell's party and the King's loyalists was in full swing".
Richard was sent out from Scituate to organize and lay out townships in what is now the state of Maine. He settled at York which was originally called Agamenticus, on a grant which was given Sir Fernandez Georges in 1622, and he named it the "City of Georgeana". Thomas Gorges was its first mayor. In 1652 Massachusetts gained control and changed the name to York.
Richard had twenty acres of land laid out to him and signed submission to Massachusetts at the dwelling house of Nicholas Davis at York, on 22 November 1652. Roland Young, the ancestor of the Young family of Annapolis, Nova Scotia, signed this paper at the same place and date.
Mr. Banks was Assistant at the Court in 1652; Selectman for 7 years; juror 12 times; a Trial Justice; Court Appraiser; Tax Commissioner; and Overseer of the County Prison.
Theodore Leslie Banks notes that: "In 1655, when Richard married his third wife, Cromwell was in his second year a Lord Protector of England, and that Charles I had been beheaded 6 years previously".
In 1673, Richard Banks, along with Edward Richworth, was a joint signer of a letter to the churches that invited deligates to a council to select the Rev. Shubael Dummer as pastor of York. This was the first church gathered in Maine and Rev. Dummer was the first settled minister. Rev. Dummer, a brother-in-law to Richard Banks, was shot, and killed, at his own door by Indians in Massacre of 1692.
Richard was killed York Raid of 1692 when Indians and French raided, killing 48 and capturing 70 others. This raid was but one of a continuing series of raids and counterraids. There is no mention of his sons Samuel and Job after that date so they may have likewise perished. His widow and two remaining sons made an agreement, on 22 April 1696, for the division of his estate (see "History of the Indian Wars of New England" by Sylvester (Vols.2,pp.462-465)).

[Notes from Eleanor Banks Vines]

Richard Bankes in his day and generation lived the life of an average man, assuming his share of the burdens and responsibilities of office as a citizen. It will be only necessary to group those public functions which he performed; - Provincial Councillor 1651, 1652, under the administration of Governor Edward Godfrey; Selectman, 1653, 1654, 1656, 1659, 1676, 1679, 1680; Juror, 1649, 1653, 1655, 1656, 1658, 1661, 1662, 1664, 1665, 1666, 1671; Trail Justice or "Commisioner," 1669, 1672, 1679; Court Appraiser, 1659, 1663, 1671, 1676, 1679, 1681, 1686, 1691, besides several other special appointment, as Tax COmmissioner 1652, Overseer of County Prison, 1673. He became a Freeman of Massachusetts at the time of the usurpation proceedings 1652, and in 1681 appears in a list of inhabitants swearing allegiance to the King. He figures once in Court (1654) as a defendant in a suit of respass, involving the title to some marsh land in York, and was defeated and muleted for cost of the suit. In 1673, with Edward Rishworth, he was the joint signer of a letter to the Churches inviting delegates to a council to settle the Rev. Shubaal Dummer, H.C., 1656 (his brother-in-law, they having married sisters) as pastor of the CHurch at York. His last public act was an appraiser, 3 April, 1691. The date of his death is not positively known, except that it occured in 1692; and as that was the year of the terrible Indian Massacre, January 25, 1691-92, when 137 inhabitants of York were either killed or carried captive to Canada by the savages, his pastor and and relative being among the dead, it is extremely probable that he met his fate also in that tragedy which sent such a shudder throughout New England.

[More notes from Eleanor Banks Vines]

In our family, the original immigrant was Richard Banks, who came to Scituate, Massachusetts, and moved before the summer of 1643 to York, Maine.
He was born in Alkam Parish, Enland, and married Elizabeth Alcocke of York.
Richard died in 1692, the year of the terrible indian raids and massacre that nearly destroyed the York settlement, and left 137 dead or taken captive into Canada. It is probable that he was among the victims. Elizabeth survived him several years. They had four sons - John, married Elizabeth Turbat, Joseph, Samuel and Job.

[Still more notes from Eleanor Banks Vines]

Richard Bankes, the emigrant ancestor of this family in Maine, was an early settler of Agamenticus (York), undoubtedly before the summer of 1643, living in that part of the town known as "Scituate," the other division being designated "Scotland." These local names are probably derived from the previous residence of the people who settled there, and in the case of Richard Bankes, it appears that in company with Abraham Preble and Thomas Curtis, at sometime prior to his settlement in Maine, he took the oath of fidelity at Scituate, Mass. With one of these fellow emigrants, for such I judge them to be, he appears in Georgiana (York), purchasing in partnership, July 19, 1645, with Abraham Preble, John Tivisden, his brother-in-law, and Thomas Curtis; and November 20th of the same year, tracts of land of Sir Ferdinando Gorges, The Lord Proprietor, and of William Hooke, one of the patentees. Finding no evidence of the residence of Richard Bankes in Scituate, I assume that the record of his oath of fidelity in that town is merely the result of a temporary sojurn there, perhaps among friends, before he chose his final home in New England; and it is of interest to note in this connection that his companion Abraham Preble married Judith Tilden of Scituate, daughter of the emigrant Nathaniel, and that an Elizabeth Bankes, who may have been a sister of Richard, married William Blackmore of Scituate in 1666, and for her second husband Jacom Bumpers of the same place. This seems to explain the local origin of the name "Scituate" as a section of the old town of York, Maine.

Richard Banks, the immigrant ancestor of this family, came to America and settled at Scituate, in Plymouth Colony. He may be the nephew Richard, son of William, mentioned in the will of John Banckes, of London, 1630. He was afterward sent to lay out and organize new townships in what is now Maine, settled in York County in that province, and held several important public offices there. He married Elizabeth, daughter of John and Elizabeth Alcocke, of York. From them through John, who married Elizabeth, daughter of Peter Turbat, Moses, who married Ruth, daughter of Elias and Magdalen Weare, came Joshua, born September 13, 1713, married September 18, 1737, Mary Muchmore, who, with all his family, came to Annapolis County in 1760. His son Moses, on his marriage, settled in Wilmot, and Joshua followed him some years later.

[Notes by Everett P. Inman]

A planter, York ME, he had 20 acres land laid out 19 Jul 1645. Was mayor 1643- 1644. An asst. at the court held at Mr Guillison's, 7 Nov 1652; he took an oath of allegience to the Mass. govt. 22 Nov 1652. Sold land 7 May 1664. Married 1st in Eng.; married 2nd to Eliz. Curtis, 3rd to Elizabeth Alcock. Was prominent in public offices; killed in Massacre of 1692.

[NI0257] Little is known about this family, but Elizabeth was still living, in Middleborough, Massachusetts, in 1709.
RESEARCH NOTE: She is said to have had seven children.

[NI0265] William came from England, in 1665, according to the History of Scituate [Samuel Deane, 1831], was a nephew of Peter Collamore [see Virkus].

[NI0275] John was not mentioned in his father’s will and probably died single.

[NI0287] John Harmon was one of the few persons in Saco Maine who owned horses in 1674. Carriages were unknown. On July 28, 1674, Richard Cummings, John Harmon and other with their horses were allowed use of Humphrey Scammon's ferry, near the mouth of Saco River. In a list of the inhabitants of Saco dated July 5, 1653, no Harmons appear.

[NI0288] Elizabeth Harmon, born at Old Orchard, the only daughter of Richard Cummings, married first her cousin, John Foxwell, and after his death, she married John Harmon, previous to 1680.

[NI0302] The Weare records give Ruth’s death as occurring in 1763 but other records give her death as 1791.

[NI0309] Richard died of a fever contracted in the army during the French and Indian Wars.

[NI0310] Elias was the Master of the sloop "Willing Mind". He is said to have lived in Scarboro, Maine.

[NI0316] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]

Benjamin Milliken was known to have expressed Tory sentiments during the American Revolution. As feelings were running high, and fearing for his family's safety, he was persuaded by friends to join the British at Castine. He subsequently removed to New Brunswick, and on August 12, 1784, with about one hundred others, known as the "Penobscot Association Loyalists," received two grants of land from the government. Their town grant comprised the town plot of St. Andrew's, the now famous summer resort; and their farm lots under separate grants included several tracts extending from Bocabec westerly along the coast to St. Stephen, with an additional tract on the St. Croix River, above what is now Milltown.

[NI0335] Joseph resided in York, Maine until age six years when he removed to Saco, Maine, with his parents.

[NI0336] Samuel moved to Biddleford, with his family, and married Phebe there. In some records, notably "Saco Valley Settlements and Families", their wedding date is shown as 1 March 1761.

[NI0339] RESEARCH NOTE: Zaccheus Banks has been placed with this family merely as a convenience to have his descendants placed within the genealogy during the research phase. It is not, for a moment, suggested that he was, in fact, a son of Samuel and he will be removed, as an unconnected line, should his ancestry remain unproven. Family tradition has it that Zaccheus descends from Richard Bancks but the connection has not yet been traced.

[NI0376] Jeremiah served in the Revolutionary War on the Massachusetts line as a private and as a sergeant.

[NI0381] Zebediah was serving under William Coffin, on board the privateer "America", in 1780.

[NI0404] Elias moved to Granville in 1761 and later, circa 1790, he crossed the Annapolis River to Clements and took up residence near Moose River. Jack Sanford, in "President John Sanford of Boston, Massachusetts" reports that Elias was the first of his family to drop the "e" from his last name.

[NI0406] Elias left home when he was young and nothing further was ever heard of him.

[NI0407] Joseph lived in Clements, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia, where he was a farmer.

[NI0410] Daniel removed to the United States.

[NI0436] Nathaniel came to Nova Scotia before the Revolution and settled in Cornwallis, Kings County.

[NI0441] Marion McCormick writes: "There is a tradition that Elias went on a voyage with his Uncle, and on their return found the harbour blockaded by the British. Having to land somewhere they went to Barrington, where Elias ramained and eventually married.
"This brings up an interesting point, since the same tradition is applied to Thomas Wheeler Banks, whose family has never yet been connected to the main line. The flaw in this reasoning is the fact that the "History of Barrington" says that Elias, of Saco, Maine, came to Barrington on a vessel with Captain Isaac Kenney, circa 1790. By that time the war was over, and there was no blockade.
"He married Heman Kenney’s daughter and soon afterward settled first on the "South Side" and in 1803 moved to Fresh Brook at Barrington Passage. Available information gives no clue as to any way Elias could have been a nephew of Captain Isaac Kenney, whose sister he married. This would seem to indicate that the reason for the voyage may have been romantic, rather than because of any blockade".

[NI0442] RESEARCH NOTE: Is George a grandson of John Means (died 1739) who came from Ireland to Boston, Massachusetts in 1718 and subsequently settled in Buckingham Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania where he married the widow Mary Kelley?

[NI0465] Zaccheus was a soldier in the Revolutionary Army.

[NI0468] According to information contained in a letter written by J. Alonzo Banks, in 1877, Thomas took a trip on his uncle’s vessel, in 1776, and upon their return found Boston Harbour blockaded, so he came to Nova Scotia and spent his minority with Colonel Lovitt. He was listed in the Annapolis Tax Roll of 1792, and was married, by banns, in that same year.
See also Elias Banks, son of Joseph and Hannah (Stackpole) Banks for further information.
Allen Benjamin, in his "Obadiah Benjamin of Nova Scotia" states that this family were from Lancaster, Massachusetts and later lived at Granville, Nova Scotia.

[NI0506] [Notes by Dawn Banks]

I remember Clarence as "gramps" - my great grandfather. Until the last couple years of his life, he was always an energetic and good humored man, with some tendency to tease.

[NI0614] Sarah was with Ruth Foster when she was killed by a falling tree.

[NI0763] John3 (John2Samuel1) Bass

born Nov.26,1658. died Sep.30,1724. married 1st about 1687, Abigail Adams, born Feb.27,1658/9, died Oct.26,1696 a. 37, dau. of Joseph & Abigail (Baxter) Adams. married 2nd Mar.17,1699 (Ch.Rec.) Rebecca Savil, born May 5,1672, died - (after him) alive Nov.30,1724, dau. of Dea. Benjamin & Lydia (Barnes) Savil.

John Bass was a cooper by trade. He was admitted to full communion Jul.31,1687. He was elected fence viewer 1693 for "the farm field".(Salter's Farm), field driver, 1696, fence viewer 1714, John Bass "drummer" was elected tithingman 1711, sealer of weights & measures 1719-21. He is probably the John Bass in King Philip's War with Joseph Adams in 1676. (Register 43-268).

Children of John & Abigail born at Braintree
John Jun.8,1688.
Samuel Jun.17,1691 (not 1671 as in published V.R.).

Child of John & Rebecca born at Braintree
Ebenezer bapt. Oct.11,1702.

S.P. 23-425: Will of John Bass, yeoman Jul.10,1723 - Nov.30,1724:
To wife Rebecca for life the end of the dwelling house next the street with the dary room, 1/4 part of the lands left me by my father's will and to her and my son Ebenezer after her death 1 acre adjoining my orchard that my father gave me, one bed & furniture thereto, 1 pair new woolen blankets, 2 pair cotton linen sheets, an iron kettle, a new brass skillet, a warming pan, 4 chairs she brought with her, her chest, the new table, all earthen & glassware, all pewter not brought with my former wife, 1 silver spoon, a trammel, peal, tongs, and gridiron, all spinning wheels for woolen or linen, and utensils about spining etc. & half all other moveables except what came with my former wife. Sons Samuel & Ebenezer to provide yearly 5 bu. Indiane Corne, 3 bu. rye, 10/ in beef, 5 lbs. sheeps wool, 3 lbs. flax, each of 'em 2 cord wood, 1 bu. malt and apples what she needs. I give her 1 cow, & all money or silver wear I leave at my decease. To her & my son Ebenezer after her all things given her by her father whether money or moveables. To son John who has had his full part of my lands already) an equal part with his two brothers of my cedar swamp & half household moveables which came by his mother & other half to his brother Samuel. To son Samuel my dwelling house, barn, & other small edifices and all land about the house & the orchard & half all other lands I have power to dispose of except 1 acre salt meadow in Broad Meadows & half & half the moveables which came by his mother. To son Ebenezer 1 salt marsh in Broad Meadows & the remaining half of lands I have power to dispose of. My malt mill & shop tools equally to my three sons, debts to be paid out of stock & remainder to son Samuel & son Ebenezer. Lands at the House Lott valued at œ60 and that at home in the orchard & in stoney field at œ10 per acre & pasture at œ6 per acre if they wish to exchange or sell. Son Samuel & wife Rebecca executors.
Witness: Jonathan, Jerusha & Benjamin Webb.

S.P. 12-273 New Series: Rebecca Bass petitioned the judge to allow the will of her husband, she is too infirm to come to court to prove it. Nov.30,1724.

[NI0767] First Episcopal Bishop of Mass.

[NI0778] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #0626, Date of Import: Oct 25, 1996]

Had 2 daughters by Mary Chapin, 5 sons and 3 daughters by Hannah Bass, and no children by Elizabeth Hobart
John Adams was his second son by his second marriage

[NI0788] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #4114, Date of Import: Apr 10, 1996]

Research: PLYMOUTH COLONY, ITS HISTORY & PEOPLE, by Eugene Aubrey Stratton
page 232. THE PIONEERS OF MASSACHUSETTS by Pope, p. 12

[NI0909] [Notes by Dawn Banks]

This may be the Harlan that I occasionally met at my grandmother's (Opal Jackson's) family get-togethers.

The last I saw of him was at Opal and Vernon Reed's 60th wedding anniversary. By this time, he was confined to a wheelchair, although I never inquired as to the nature of his ailment.

[NI0984] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #4114, Date of Import: Apr 10, 1996]

Nothing is known for certain of his English background other than
Bradford's words that Alden "was hired for a cooper, at South-Hampton,
wher the ship victuled; and being a hopefull young man, was much desired,
but left to his own liking to go or stay when he came here (Plymouth
Colony; but he stayed, and maryed here."

His progeny are among the most numerous of Mayflower descendants. His
house in Duxbury may still be visited.

Research: See file in section U.S. Ancestry, Compuserve, by Jennifer Bates
Nath, 72634,1265 PLYMOUTH COLONY ITS HISTORY & PEOPLE by Eugene Aubrey
Stratton, pages 232-233, quoting from BRADFORD [FORD] 2/400.

THE PIONEERS OF MASSACHUSETTS by Pope, p. 12

[NI1164] RESEARCH NOTE: The Whitman genealogy shows her as Maria Beckwith and this is entirely possible as this individual does not appear in the Patterson genealogy. Can Jean Beckwith shed any light on this problem?

[NI1171] John farmed Stronach Mt. all his life.

[NI1203] William Hawken moved much of his family to the US at the end of the 19th century. I do not know whether this is related to the following fact, but taken together, the two are interesting.

Family document archives contain some correspondence between William Hawken and a Mr. Lake, in which the latter is taking William to task, apparently over his executorship of the will of John Scott. One of his letters (or collection of run-on sentences), dated 10/10/1885 to Wm. Hawken reads:

To Mr. W. Hawken
Sir,
I cannot understand how it is that I have not received any reply to my answer to yours which was written to me on the 21st of August desiring to know if we would like a copy of the Will of the late John Scott my Wife's Father. I wrote to you asking for a copy of the same to be forwarded to us having received no answer I would like to know what you mean by your delay in not sending it or has it been delayed in transit if the fault is on your side I speak plain and must say that your treatment to us has not been gentlemanly in keeping us in the dark as you have done. I should have thought you would have let us know how the estate stood so that all controversy might have been avoided but it appears to me that you as Trustee and Mrs. Martin my wife sister is leauge together to keep us in ignorances of the all the affair. Who else I would as is witness to the will besides yourself there should be another unless Mr. Scott as left you to do as you like. What have you done by the house and the few things thats was in it is that lock up to not now. Sir in closing I tell you plainly that if my demands is not complied with ant hat very shortly I mean to put the affair in the hands of a solicitor if all is lost let it be we shant be no worse off in few years and you and her sister will ne no better as for the will. I demand a copy of the same and that speedily remaining.

Yours,
W. H. Lake
25 Paris Street
Guernsey

To Mr. W. Hawken
Cornwall

[NI1229] Seraphina was a spinster of St. Mary's Parish, at the time of her marriage to Alden.

[NI1249] [Notes by Everett P. Inman]

He was a mariner. His father was a vintner and originally settled at `Nantascot' now Hull, MA in 1621/2. Not certain whether his mother was his father's 1st wife or Frances, his 2nd.

[NI1267] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 7, Ed. 1, Tree #2053, Date of Import: Feb 4, 1998]

Joseph Spinney was a grantee in Aylesford Aug 30, 1783, and a Joseph Spinney s/o Samuel and Elizabeth of Granville, Annaplois County, m in Aylesford Oct 5, 1797 Sara Beech....(find rest)

A slight sketch of the Spinney family will be found in the Calnek-Savary History of Annapolis pp604-5

[NI1289] William was of Bear River, Digby County, Nova Scotia, and was a sea captain. He had six children by his first marriage to Rachel Beals.

[NI1290] Dimock was shown as a shoemaker in Meadowvale in the Census of 1886.

[NI1309] Alden was from Wilmot. After his marriage he settled on a farm he purchased in Harmony, circa 1850. Their first house was a small structure and it is still in use, as a storage building, after having been moved from its original site.

[NI1310] [Notes by Everett P. Inman]

She saw her first husband, Nathaniel Adams, killed in 1692; she was marched to Canada as captive. Redeemed in 1695, she returned to York and married Elias Weare. In 1707, as she returned from church with husband and son, Elias was killed by Indians and her brother carried off. She married John Webber in 1709.

[NI1317] [Notes by Everett P. Inman]

He came to Plymouth, MA on the "Fortune" in 1621; wife and 2 children followed in the "Anne" in 1623. His letter published in 1622 is the first by a Plymouth Pilgrim. Left in 1624 after a church`row' when Rev Lyford baptized one of his children. Moved to Dover, NH where he was a Commissioner. Removed to Kittery after 20 years-thence to York-1650

[NI1318] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 5, Ed. 1, Tree #2936, Date of Import: May 16, 1997]

While I have no proof, there is a possibility that the Hilton's or "de Hilton's" go back to the 11th century in England. Focusing on the ancestry of William Hilton may pay dividends because of this possibility.

[Notes by Everett P. Inman]

Family probably originated in Lancashire and moved to Northwich about 1550 engaged in salt production. Had 6 children according to his will which was proved 28 Oct 1605.

[NI1326] [Notes by Everett P. Inman]

Peter Weare's 2nd wife (his 1st was Ruth Gooch); their marriage was apparently stormy as she was indicted for "living from her husband" in 1675. Later he was ordered to provide her means and they lived together after.

There is a controversy over the spelling of this surname.

Mike McCormick, a descendant of Elias Weare has more documentation on the PURRINGTON spelling than the PUDDINGTON spelling. Also, I have found the PURRINGTON spelling in historical publications.

Mike McCormick P.O. Box 510 Terre Haute, IN 47808 BrismileMac@msn.com

[NI1327] [Notes by Everett P. Inman]

Came to New England with brother, Robert, some years before 1640; first records are 1640 when he was alderman and deputy to the provincial court. He was an inn keeper. Died between 3 Jul 1647 and 5 Jun 1649 and his will was dated 25 Jun 1647. He had two sons and three daughters.

[NI1328] [Notes by Everett P. Inman]

She married (2nd) Major John Davis about 1659. She lived after he died in 1691 and probably died before 1696 when George Puddington's will came to light. The will seems to have been hidden as a child, Sarah, (who may have been fathered by a Parson Burdett) was left out of the will.

[NI1329] Ada was eight years old at the time of her father's death.

[NI1351] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 7, Ed. 1, Tree #2053, Date of Import: May 16, 1997]

Obituary - April 1975 (paper unknown)

BERWICK, N.S. - William Leander Fredricks, 3, of Berwick passed away Sunday at the Country Home Nursing Home Limited, Kentville.
Born in Woodville, he was a son of the late John and Josephine (Johnson) Fredricks.
He is survived by sons, Perley, Somerset; John, Waterville; Victor, Ontario; daughters, Josephine (Mrs. Wylie Banks), Port Williams; Dorothy (Mrs. Arthur Stedman), South Berwick; Gladys (Mrs. Ralph Ward), Kentville; Madeline (Mrs. Donald Weatherbee), North Alton; Marion (Mrs. Henry Taylor), South Berwick; Marjorie (Mrs. Edwin Howell), Spryfield; 41 grandchildren, 116 great-grandchildren and eight great-great-grandchildren.
He was predeceased by his wife, the former Eunice Ann Banks, son Kenneth, and his brothers and sisters.
The remains rested at the H.C. Lindsay Funeral Home, Berwick. Funeral Service was held on Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. from the Berwick United Church. Reverend Arthur Whiston assisted by Rev. Laurie Fenerty
officiated with interment in the Berwick Cemetery.

[NI1353] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 7, Ed. 1, Tree #2053, Date of Import: May 16, 1997]

Sea man

[NI1354] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 7, Ed. 1, Tree #2053, Date of Import: May 16, 1997]

1871 Census - Lists her as Flora

[NI1359] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 7, Ed. 1, Tree #2053, Date of Import: May 16, 1997]

Hannah and Eliphalet resided in Aylesford, Kings County, Nova Scotia until their lands were sold in paymentof debts; whereupon they removed to Bear River. An entry in the Registry of Deeds, Book 32, page 46 and 47, states that land of Eliphalet Banks was sold for debt in Wilmot for 100 pounds sterling, 4 December 1820. In Bear River he had a saw mill at the outlet to Lake LeMarchant.
Hannah and Eliphalet are 1st Cousins through Timothy and Judith (Rowell) Saunders.

[NI1366] As a young lad, Abe participated in the construction of the old trunk
road near Round Hill where he was a "dynamite man". Abe was a farmer by
trade and managed apple orchards. Rodney Banks of Spa Springs reports
that Abe also had a gold mine on Canaan Road and a sawmill at Woodland
(near Roxbury Road).

[NI1382] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Ethel provided much of the information on the eighteen children of the "great" Alexander Banks by his two wives. This information was communicated to Granville Thompson and passes on to Don Banks for the genealogy. Leone (Banks) Cousins also visited Ethel and gathered additional information on her genealogy.

[NI1394] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 7, Ed. 1, Tree #2053, Date of Import: May 16, 1997]

Taylor, Marion Elizabeth - October (3) 1992 (paper unknown)
70, Berwick South, died October 3, 1992 in Western Kings Memorial Hospital, Berwick. Born in Berwick, she was a daughter of the late William L. and Eunice (Banks) Fredericks. She was a member of Berwick Baptist Church.
She is survived by a son; Henry, Black Rock; six daughters, Judy Webster, Garland; Wendy (Mrs. David Anderson), Waterville; Sandra (Mrs. Douglas Smith), Marlene (Mrs. Gerald Wolsey) both of Berwick; Linda (Mrs. Allister
Keddy), Black Rock); Dale, Kentville; brother, John, Waterville; four sisters, Dorothy Steadman, South Berwick; Madeline Weatherbee, North Alton; Marjorie (Mrs. Edwin Howell), Truro; Gladys Ward, Kentville; 17
grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband, W. Henry; three brothers, Perley, Eugine, Kenneth; sister Josephine. The body is in H.C. Lindsay Memorial Chapel, Berwick, visiting 2-4, 7-9 p.m. today, where funeral will be 2 p.m. Tuesday, Rev. Wayne Coleman officiating. Burial will be in Berwick Cemetery.
Donations may be made to Canadian Diabetes Association or Heart and Stroke Foundation of Nova Scotia.

[NI1412] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 7, Ed. 1, Tree #2053, Date of Import: May 16, 1997]

Banks, Clyde Raymond Sr. - November (28) 1990, The Chronicle-Herald

87, Waterville, died Wednesday in Camp Hill Hospital Halifax. Born in Waterville, Kings County, he was the son of the late John and Alfreda (Sanford) Banks. He lived in Waterville most of his life and spent the
past seven years in Truro. He was employed int eh canning industry in Waterville, where he was factory manager for more than 50 years. He was employed with Annapolis Valley Canners, Port Williams, prior to retirement. He was a member of Valley Lodge 90, AF and AM, where he was past master and member for more than 40 years. He was and active member of the Waterville Baptist Church. He is survived by a daughter, Verna (Mrs. Cecil Brownell), Truro; four grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; several nieces
and nephews. He was predeceased by his wife the former Hazel Robinson; a son, Clyde A.; four brothers, James, Brenton, William, Ivan; four sisters, Jessie Lilah, Gladys, Eunice; two grandchildren. The body is in H.C. Lindsay Memorial Chapel, Berwick, visiting 7-9 p.m. tonight, where a masonic service will be 7:30 pm tonight. Funeral will be 2 p.m. Saturday in Waterville Baptist Church, Rev. Leo Fletcher officiating.
Burial will be in Berwick Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Waterville Baptist Church.

[NI1425] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Alexander and Ada are 3rd cousins, through Joshua and Mary (Muchmore) Banks; 6th cousins, through John and Ruth (Alden) Bass; and half-2nd cousins, through Moses Banks and his two wives, Jane Spinney and Judith Saunders.

[NI1437] Daniel and his brother, Isaac, founded New Albany, in 1808.
Daniel settled on a farm at New Albany, near his brother Isaac, "whose mantle seemed to have descended upon him"; he came to his end by accident; in running out a sled suddenly, the end of the tongue struck him in the stomach, and after suffering about twenty-four hours he expired.
RESEARCH NOTE: There is some confusion as to Daniel's first wife. Charles Farnam, in his Whitman family genealogy (1889), shows Ann Dykeman while Charles Whitman, in his 1972 Whitman family genealogy, shows Nancy Roop. Is it possible that Nancy was his second wife and that Zachariah and Craft are her children, and that perhaps she died shortly after Craft was born? The 9 June 1853 edition of the Christian Messenger mentions only Ann Dykeman and Jane Banks this would seem to indicate that Zachariah and Craft were the children of Ann, and that Nancy Roop is a "red herring".

[NI1444] Jeremy died single and a letter written by J. Alonzo Banks states that he died, as a young man, from poison ivy.

[NI1455] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 7, Ed. 1, Tree #2053, Date of Import: May 16, 1997]

Obituary: Tuesday, December 27, 1983 (paper unknown)

BERWICK - Irleen Emma Fredricks, 66, of Berwick, died Sunday in Western Kings Memorial Hospital, Berwick.
Born in Hantsport, she was a daughter of the late Joshua and Emma (Spidell) Thompkins.
She was an employee of M.W. Graves for a number of years.
She is survived by four sons, Warren Thompkins, Hantsport; William, Berwick; Percy, Clementsvale; Burton, Waterville; Four daughters, Mrs. Barbara Fretwell, Ottawa; Bernice (Mrs. Harry MacNeil), Toronto; May Ernest, Dartmouth; Rose (Mrs. Jaris Johnanson, British Columbia); a brother Percy,
Hanstport; 19 grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.
The body is in H.C. Lindsay Funeral Home, Berwick, where funeral will be 2 p.m., Thursday, Rev. Bernard Armstrong officiating. Burial in Berwick Cemetery. Donations may be made to Western Kings Hospital, Berwick.

Irleen had her first child before she was married. Warren was raised by her parents as their child.
After her divorce from John, Irleen's 4 children from the marriage (Barb, Bill, Bernice and Percy) were placed in foster care.

Irleen then had 5 children after the divorce. The first 3 were placed with relatives, and the last 2 were given/taken by childrens aid for adoption.

It is believed that Warren, Burton and Rose have the same father - Patrick Beaver.

Irleen also insists that May's father is John Fredericks, even though she was conceived after John's second marriage.

Obituary: Tuesday, December 27, 1983 (paper unknown)

BERWICK - Irleen Emma Fredricks, 66, of Berwick, died Sunday in Western
Kings Memorial Hospital, Berwick.
Born in Hantsport, she was a daughter of the late Joshua and Emma
(Spidell) Thompkins.
She was an employee of M.W. Graves for a number of years.
She is survived by four sons, Warren Thompkins, Hantsport; William,
Berwick; Percy, Clementsvale; Burton, Waterville; Four daughters, Mrs.
Barbara Fretwell, Ottawa; Bernice (Mrs. Harry MacNeil), Toronto; May
Ernest, Dartmouth; Rose (Mrs. Jaris Johnanson, British Columbia); a
brother Percy, Hanstport; 19 grandchildren and several nieces and
nephews.
The body is in H.C. Lindsay Funeral Home, Berwick, where funeral will be
2 p.m., Thursday, Rev. Bernard Armstrong officiating. Burial in Berwick
Cemetery. Donations may be made to Western Kings Hospital, Berwick.

[NI1459] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]

Arthur was delivered by a Dr. Spear, in Osawatomie, Kansas. His mother, Mary Stanley was working at the insane asylum in town at the time. When Arthur was a year old, the family moved to Kansas. His mother taught school at Oak Grove, and he remembered years later that she would take him with her to class.

When the family moved to California, Arthur worked as a farm laborer for Kraft Brothers in Merced. In 1939 he got a job as a chauffeur for a wealthy woman named Mrs. Gramson, who lived in Santa Monica, California, at the Miramar Hotel. He stayed at the job until 1942, when he went to work for the Santa Monica Cab Co. Shortly afterward, there was a labor dispute, and Arthur hired on to work for Southern Counties Gas Company as temporary help.

He married Christine (Layton) Stewart while at the gas company. Being married, he wanted a permanent job, so he took his new wife and stepson with him back to Kraft Bros., in Merced. Then, in September he got his draft notice. The draft board was in Santa Monica, and because his wife's father, Melvin Layton, also lived in Santa Monica, they moved the family back there. They loaded up their Packard and moved back. On October 3, 1942 Arthur rode the streetcar to Fort MacArthur in San Pedro. From there he was sent to Fort Lewis, Washington for basic training.

On July 2, 1943 a daughter, Diana was born. Since Arthur was due to ship out on July 4, the army did not give him the telegram about his new daughter until they were two days at sea, on July 5. He figured they were afraid he might go AWOL.

His company was sent to the island of Maui, Hawaii. For five months the company served guard duty on the north shore, and there was little to do. Arthur
served as a driver, and his duties were mostly to haul PX supplies, deliver reels of movie film, and drive the baseball team around.

In 1944 Arthur's company shipped to the island of Finschausen in New Guinea. There, Arthur trained in amphibious tanks and trucks. In September they shipped to the islant of Moratai, where they saw action. In January 1945 they went to Luzon in the Phillipines. They were in the battles of Lingayen Gulf and Baguio.
By the time they took Baguio (in June) the European part of the war was over. Everyone knew that there would be high casualties if they had to invade Japan. But, Arthur had enough points to be sent home. While he was waiting to ship home, the bomb was dropped on Japan and the war was over. He left Manila in September, and was discharged October 3, exactly three years from the day he left home in Santa Monica.

While he had been overseas, Christine had been able to save the money for a down payment on a house, and it was to that house that Arthur arrived home. The address was 1253 19th St., Santa Monica, California. He got home a day earlier than expected, and decided to surprise his wife. When he walked into the house, there was a little two-and-a-half year old girl (his daughter Diana, whom he had never seen) who yelled out, "Mommy, there's a man in the house!" That was the first time he saw his daughter.

Arthur worked briefly for Standard Oil co., in El Segundo, CA, then decided to go back to Merced and work for the Kraft Bros. He worked there four years, living in Merced, before returning to Santa Monica in 1950, when he hired on once again to the Southern Counties Gas Company, this time permanently.

He remained at the gas company for 27 years, until going on disability in 1977, at which time he again moved back to Merced. He remained in his Merced home at 2955 Crestwood Ct. until his death in 1987.

[NI1460] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]

Christine was a commercial artist and a world renknown leather carver. Her works appeared over the years in publications by the Tandy Co., and in other leathercraft magazines. She also designed many leather carving tools and kits for the Tandy Co.

[NI1462] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]


In 1920 the A.G. Stanley family moved from Kansas to Okmulgee, Oklahoma. Arthur worked building oil derricks, while his wife, Mary taught school at Oak Grove. The school board ordered the district to build a house for the teacher, and Arthur was hired to build it.

In 1924 Arthur began to make bootleg whiskey for extra money. It eventually became his full time occupation. In about 1927 Arthur and Mary bought a 60 acre farm outside Okmulgee. Though the family owned the farm until 1964, they rented it out and moved to California in 1935. They bought a used 1930 for the trip. Arthur built a two wheel trailer to pull behind it, and they loaded all their eartly possessions and headed west.

In California, they settle first in Kernville. Arthur and his 16 year-old son worked as movie extras there for a time. Then, traveling into the San Joaquin Valley, they found work at Merced, California.

[NI1468] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]

Orenzo was a schoolteacher, and began teaching in St. Joseph County, Indiana in 1850. Several years later he was at the head of the Ripley County schools. He moved to Iowa briefly in 1858, then to Missouri in 1859. He did some teaching in Missouri, but mostly farmed his 122 acres in Walnut Township, Adair County. He also held several local political offices, and declined a nomination for state office. In 1860, he was among four people in the township to vote for Abe Lincoln. One of the other votes came from his uncle, James P. Milliken.

Orenzo & Diana Milliken appear in the 1870 Missouri Census on pg. 57, shown living in Walnut Township.

[NI1469] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]

[ possible ancestor of Diana Dorsch]

"Before the honorable Thomas Willing, Esq. Philadelphia, 17 day of September, 1771. The foreigners whose hames are hereunto subscribed, imported in the "Minerva," Captain Thomas Arnot, Master, from Rotterdam, but last from Cowes, did this day subscribe the usual qualification; (99 persons in the list) : - Johan Freiderich Dorsch

From - Pennsylvania German Pioneers V.1
Strassburger & Hinke - Gen. Pub. Co. pg. 733

Also;

List of German Passengers on board the Brig "Dispatch" from Rotterdam, Capt. Jonathon Veder, October 31, 1786 -

passenger #12 - Adam Dorsch, with wife and two children, Maria Sallemie and Margarietta.

From - PA Germen Pioneers V. 7

[NI1471] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]

The 1965 City Directory for Ossawatomie lists Addie Prentice's address as:
533 Pacific Ave.

Addie's funeral was held in the Eddy Chapel, Osawatomie, Kansas, Tuesday, December 5, 1967 at 2:00 pm, the Rev. Joe N. Hughes officiating. She is buried at the Beagle, Kansas cemetary.

[NI1473] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]

Elias Milliken appears in the 1860 Missouri Census, living at Liberty Twp., Adair County. (pg. 100).

[NI1476] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]

Francis Milliken served in Company C, 63rd Indiana Infantry during the Civil War. In his later years, he lived in the Old Soldier's Home in Marshalltown, Iowa.

[NI1477] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]

The turners lived in Middleville, Michigan and had four children.

[NI1478] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]

Jasper Milliken enlisted in Company B of the 30th Iowa Infantry on August 9, 1862 at Drakesville, Iowa. He enlisted on the same day, at the same place as his uncle, James P. Milliken. They were mustered into serve at Keokuk, Iowa on September 23, 1862.

Jasper was with his regiment through the seige of Vicksburg, where his uncle, then Major James Milliken, was killed leading the regiment on the final assault of that city. He was present at the surrender of Vicksburg on July 4, 1863. He was also in the battles of Jackson, and Brandon, Mississippi. He was in the hospital at Memphis for a time, then rejoined his regiment at Woodville, Alabama in March, 1864. He was with General W.T. Sherman through the entire Atlanta campaign, and on the march through Georgia. He was in the battles of Resaca, Adairville, Allatoona, Newhope Church, Big Shanty, Kenesaw Mountain, and was at both battles of Atlanta, July 27 and 28, 1864. He was at Savannaugh when the Confederate army evacuated the city. He fought at Columbus, South Carolina, at Orangeburgh, Goldsboro, Bentonville, and Raleigh, North Carolina, where General Johnston surrendured. In May, 1865 he marched with his Regiment in the Grand Review in Washington, D.C.

After the war he lived in Pulaski, Iowa, where he was employed as postmaster.

[NI1479] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]

This James P. Milliken (named after his uncle of the same name) served in the Missouri State Militia for a while, then enlisted in the 15th Iowa Infantry and served through the end of the Civil War.

After the war, he farmed in Raritan and Stronghurst, Illinois.

[NI1480] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]

Elias Milliken appears in the 1790 Federal Census for Hancock County, Maine, township #6, West side of Union River. His family is listed as having one male over 16 years of age, one male under 16 years, and two females.

In the 1800 Federal Census Elias is listed as still owning the same property, which is identified as "plantation #6." His wife and three other persons are counted (though not named).

In 1817 he removed briefly to Ohio, and then on to Dearborn County, Indiana. He is listed in the 1820 Indiana Census, living in the town of Manchester in Dearborn County. Six other persons are living in the household, other than Elias and his wife, 2 young girls, and four boys.

In the 1830 Indiana Census Elias is living in Addison, Shelby Co., Indiana.

[NI1482] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]

James P. Milliken emigrated with his parents to Indiana at the age of fourteen, and began farming as an adult. From early on, he took an interest in politics, and was active in the temperance movement. He was three times elected to the state assembly, and twice to the Indiana state senate, representing Dearborn County. In 1858, he moved to Kirksville, Missouri, where it was a political hotbed between pro-slavery and anti-slavery forces. The Millikens were on the side opposed to slavery, and James (along with a Mr. Guy Chandler) cast the first to votes for Abraham Lincoln from in Kirksville in 1860.

He was an outspoken abolitionist, and his life was threatened several time by pro-slavery factions, to the point where he had to sell his farm and move out of the state. He settled in Davis country, Iowa in 1861.

When the southern states seceded, he was outraged, and, although 59 years old at the time, he enlisted in The 30th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, Company B (under Captain Clark.) He enlisted at Drakesville, Iowa on August 9, 1862, and his nephew, Jasper Milliken enlisted along with him. He was immediately elected 2nd Lieutenant of Company B (companies elected their own officers.) He was mustered into service on September 22, 1862.

The 30th Iowa went to the front in October, 1862, being in General W. T. Sherman's corps, under U.S. Grant. They were involved in the attack on Haines Bluff, north of Vicksburg on December 27 and 28. James Milliken and his company were in the battle of Arkansas Post on January 11, 1863. On April 19, Lieutenant Milliken was promoted to Major of the 30th Iowa, over all the other line officers of the regiment, his promotion cited for, "Gallantry in battles." He was 60 years old by this time.

Major Milliken was with his regiment at the second battle of Haines Bluff, on May 1, was in the famous crossing of the Mississippi at Brumsburg and Hardtimes, was at the battles of Port Gibson, Edward's Ferry, Raymond, Clinton, and at the capture of Jackson, Mississippi. He also took part in the bloody battle of Champion Hills, and Black River.

On May 22, 1863, before the beginning of the long seige, a second attack was ordered against the heavily defended town of Vicksburg. It was during this attack that Major James P. Milliken was killed, leading his regiment into battle.

[NI1500] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]

Robert was an officer in the British Navy during the American Revolution. While at Castine, he became enamored of Phebe, the daughter of Benjamin Milliken, then living in her father's house. At one time he went on shore to visit her, leaving his vessel in the care of a subordinate, and for neglect of duty, lost his command.

[NI1519] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]

Occupation - farmer, teacher, and accountant. Lived at South Bend, Indiana. Served in the Civil War.

[NI1521] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]

Scott Mouse was a realtor in Emporia, Kansas.

[NI1526] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 6, Ed. 1, Tree #3393, Date of Import: May 17, 1997]

Charles Milliken was an osteopath, having graduated from the American School of Osteopathy in 1903. He moved to Whitier, California, where he practiced from 1907 to 1955. After retirement, he moved back to Kirksville.

[NI1562] [David Avery Hascall.ged]

Provided by: Mark K. Davis >

[NI1573] [David Avery Hascall.ged]

Provided by: Mark K. Davis >

[NI1579] Peter Banks, of Nictaux, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia has a diary that Janetta kept on her voyages with her second husband, Captain Spicer. The ship was the "Glooscap", out of Parsboro, Nova Scotia.

[NI1583] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #4114, Date of Import: Apr 10, 1996]

Died during first year at Plymouth Colony. Children are listed in
approximate order of birth, as Stratton gives no dates.

Research: PLYMOUTH COLONY ITS HISTORY & PEOPLE by Eugene Aubrey Stratton,
page 331 .

Whether Alice Atwood is the "Alice," spouse of William Mullins is unsupported, but included here to reflect wishful thinking.

[NI1608] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #4114, Date of Import: Apr 10, 1996]

Brought his family on the Mayflower. He was one of the more prosperous of the original settlers. Research: PLYMOUTH COLONY ITS HISTORY & PEOPLE by Eugene Aubrey Stratton, page 331 and 332.

MULLINS. William Mullins is not descended from any Molyneaux family, nor does he have any
proven royal ancestry. There is no evidence that his wife Alice was named Alice Atwood
or Alice Poretiers. [MD 44:38-43]

ANCESTRAL SUMMARY:

William Mullins does not have any Molyneaux ancestors--one of the most common myths in all of Mayflower genealogy. He has no proven royal ancestry, no proven Huguenot ancestors, and the names of his parents have never been proven though John Mullyns and Joane Bridger seem to be the best candidates. [Mayflower Descendant 44:41]

Further, the maiden name of his wife Alice is not known. It has not been proven to be Atwood, Poretiers, or any of the other identifications that are floating around. [Mayflower Descendant 44:44]



BIOGRAPHICAL SUMMARY:

William Mullins was a fairly well-to-do shoe and boot dealer from Dorking, Surrey, England. He purchased a number of shares in the Pilgrims joint-stock company, becoming one of the Merchant Adventurers. He brought his wife Alice, daughter Priscilla and son Joseph to America on the Mayflower. Only Priscilla would survive the first winter, however. William Mullins made out his death-bed will on 21 February 1620/1, in which he mentions his wife Alice, daughter Priscilla, son Joseph, and married children William and Sarah who were still in Dorking. He also mentions a "Goodman Woodes" who remains unidentified, and a "Master Williamson" which was a pen-name for William Brewster who was a fugitive from the English crown.



SOURCES:

1. Mayflower Descendant 1:231-232, "The Will of William Mullins"

2. Mayflower Descendant 7:37,179, "The Estates of William(2) Mullins", by George Bowman

3. Mayflower Descendant 44:39-44, "The Mullins Family", by Alicia Crane Williams

4. Mayflower Quarterly 39:83, "William Mullin's Grandchildren in England", by Robert S. Wakefield

5. Alicia Crane Williams, Families of Pilgrims: John Alden and William Mullins, Mass. Soc. of Mayf. Desc., 1986

[NI1616] [Notes by Everett P. Inman]

He was a clothier and owned a mill in Tiverton, Devon which burned down just before his death; this caused the financial difficulty which probably made sons George and Robert to emigrate to Agamenticus and Portsmouth respctively some time before 1640. His father's will (1630/1) was made to his 2nd wife,Anne. His house was left to George.

[NI1618] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 5, Ed. 1, Tree #3369, Date of Import: Jun 2, 1997]

From "Genealogy of Hezekiah Purrington (1715-1765) (of the fourth generation) published by Pur(r)in(g)ton Family Association of USA, Inc, circa 1975"

Andrew Puddington had two sons. (John and Roger). They carried on the family business after the father's death. John made his will on April 26, 1619. He bequeathed "to the church and to the poor of Tiverton, to John Puddington, Jr., to Roger Puddington his brother, all his messauge in Tiverton on Peter Street ... ." Roger Puddington made his will on June 26, 1624, leaving "to brother John Puddington to have during his life all houses and grounds which I have in Possession, then to Margaret wife of William Marke." Executors of Rogers will were John Puddington of Tiverton, clothier, and Nicholas Puddington, weaver.

Both Roger and John had several sons and daughters. It is not clear which John of the two was the father of Robert Puddington, but it is known that Robert (with sons Joshua, George, and Robert) was the grandson of Andrew Puddington.

[NI1619] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 5, Ed. 1, Tree #3369, Date of Import: Jun 2, 1997]

From "Genealogy of Hezekiah Purrington (1715-1765) (of the fourth generation) by Pur(r)in(g)ton Family Association of USA, Inc c 1975"

Tiverton, the original place of our ancestors, is about fourteen miles from the County Seat, Exeter, in Devonshire, in the southern part of England. It was said to be a prosperous place according to Black's Guide Book of Devonshire edited by A.R. Hop Moncrieff 1911, London. Tiverton is a spot of "some antiquity which more than once suffered from disastrous fires without losing all its monuments."

It is said St. Peter's Street is the street upon which our ancestor lived and died. Eben Putnam gives the following account in Putnam's Historical Magazine, p. 47 of "Materials for a Genealogy of the Families by the name of Purrington."

"Puddington, of Tiverton, Devonshire, England.

"My attention was attracted to Devonshire, as the probably home of our New England settlers of this name by the wills ... During the Spring of 1898 I had an opportunity to study such evidence as appeared among the wills at Exeter. Later, during my work in London, I found interesting materials concerning this family.

"Puddington is a parish in Witheridge Hundred, Archdeaconry of Barnstable, County of Devon. Puddington was probably the home of the first family who came to Exeter, and it is thus doubtless how he got his name. I do not know how early the name appears in Tiverton.

"John, Richard, and Andre3w Puddington appear to have been contemporaries and to have lived in Tiverton during the latter half of the sixteenth century. They were weavers and clothiers, those trades being the chief business of the place. From these persons, probably kinsmen, if not brothers, are descended the families mentioned below. It is the opinion from the foregoing work, though lacing positive proof, that the Maine family descended from Andrew Puddington who died 1619."

PUDDINGTON * PURRINGTON
FAMILY
Calendar of Bishop of Exeter 1555 - 1700

1643 Puddington, William Tiverton W

Archdeaconry Court of Exeter 1540 - 1700

1588 Puddington, Andrew Tyverton copy test 470
1592 Puddington, William - missius adm.
1618 Puddington, John sen Tiverton W
1624 Puddington, Roger Tiverton W
1635 Puddington, John Tiverton W
1646 Puddington, John Tiverton A
1646 Puddington, John & Andrew Tiverton A
1646 Puddington, John Tiverton W
1677 Puddington, Nicholas Tiverton A
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
P.C.C.

1489 Padington (Padyngton formerly),-
Alice, Friers friehours,
London 22 miles
1486 Patington, Thomas, St. Nicholas
Coldabbey, London 14 Logge
1597 Perington, Robert
Abbotts Lyghe, 36 Cotham
Somerset 1629

Consistory Court of Bishop of Exeter 1532 - 1700
Taken from Ms at N.E.G.H. Society SG Pud 3 of research of George Walter Chamberlain, Malden, Mass. The search was requested by Amelia J. Purrington, Hotel Buckingham, Fifth Ave., N.Y.

Facts found in original records:-
Variations noted in surnames: Puddington, Puddenton, Pudington, Podinton, Purrington, Purrinton, Purington, Pearinton, Peurinton, Purintum, Puerenton, Purinton.

G.W. Chamberlain states evidence is conclusive and would be accepted in the courts of law of this country establishing ancestry to a man who was chosen alderman of Georgeana - the oldest city of New England - now York, ME. - in 1642.

"Andrew Puddington, of Tiverton, will was dated 6 April 1588. He directs that his body be buried in the church yard. He bequeaths to the poor of Tiverton, to his wife Joane, to his son John (a loom), daughter Joane (26 pence), daughter Marie Puddington, daughter Ebbote Puddington, son Roger (executor). He appoints John King, Vinter, and John Puddington, weaver, overseers. Witnessed by Thomas Hellinge, John King, John Puddington, Richard Puddington with others. The legacies to the daughters consisted of silver spoons, cups, etc. (Principal registry, Exeter, vol. 1588, p. 470)"

Andrew Puddington d. 1619 Tiverton, England
Sons: 1. John
2. Roger

As will be noted above Andrew Puddington had two sons. They carried on the family business after the father's death John made his will on April 26, 1619. He bequeathed "to the church and to the poor of Tiverton, to John Puddington, Jr., to Roger Puddington his brother, all his messauge in Tiverton on Peter Street... ." Roger Puddington made his will on June 26, 1624, leaving "to brother John Puddington to have during his life all houses and grounds which I have in Possession, then to Margaret wife of William Marke." Executors of Rogers will were John Puddington of Tiverton, Clothier, and Nicholas Puddington, weaver.

Both Roger and John had several sons and daughters. It is not clear which John of the two was the father of Robert Puddington, but it is known that his Robert was the grandson of Andrew Puddington

The name of this Word file is ANDPUDD.DOC

[NI1636] John3 (Thomas2Samuel1) Bass

born Mar.26,1675, died -. married Mar.7,1694/5 Elizabeth Neale, born Jun.28,1675, died -, dau. of Henry & Hannah (Pray) Neale. He removed to Lebanon, Conn. where several other children were born.

Children of John 3rd & Elizabeth born @ Braintree (1st 5)
Elizabeth Sep.5,1696, m. John Kinsley.
Sarah Sep.19,1699, m. Ichabod Woodworth.
Thomas Oct.7,1701, m. Dorothy Parish.
Henry May 20,1704, m. Elizabeth Church.
John May 13,1706, died young.
John 1708, died 1719 at Lebanon, Ct.
Hannah May 27,1711 at Windham, Ct., m. Capt. Zebulon Hibbard.
Priscilla 1713, died 1714.
Priscilla Jun.6,1717, m. Eldad Kingsley.
Zebulon 1718, died 1719.

[NI1637] Genealogy Directory of New England Vol 1 A-C

THOMAS BASS 1635-1720 WAS DEACON.. MARRIED TWICE AFTER FIRST WIFE DIED,

Dea. Thomas2 (Samuel1) Bass

no probate. born - before May 1635, probably at Roxbury. died "Dea. Bass" Jan.8,1719/20 at Weymouth. married 1st Oct.4,1660 at Medfield, Sarah Wood, born Dec.25,1642 at Roxbury (Ch.Rec.), died Dec.24,1678, dau. of Nicholas & Mary (Pidge) Wood of Braintree etc. married 2nd Nov.30,1680, Susannah Blanchard, widow of Nathaniel Blanchard, born -, died - (alive Dec.7,1706)(& Aug.19,1712- S.D. 39-88), dau. of Elder Edward & Susannah ( - ) Bates of Weymouth. He was made freeman May 14,1656.

Thomas Bass & wife Sarah were admitted from the church in Medfield Sep.10,1676. Susanna wife of Thomas Bass admitted from Weymouth church May 30,1686. No settlement of his estate as only one son survived him. He was a weaver.

Children of Dea. Thomas & Sarah

born, first two probably at present Natick (Sherborn) where Nicholas Wood estate was located, but recorded at Medfield the nearest town, then rest born at Braintree.

Thayer Gen. (1874) gives a Sarah Bass who m. Josiah Thayer of Mendon. This is unproven and very doubtful. The Haviland Mass. at R.I. Hist. Soc. calls Sarah a dau. of Thomas Bass, and is followed by the Bass Gen. (1940). There is no evidence for it.

Abigail Jan.2,1667/8 at Medfield (Sherborn).
Samuel Dec.20,1672 at Medfield (Sherborn)., died Aug. 1690 at sea of small pox in Canada Expedition. Body thrown over board at Nantasket.
Mary Apr.20,1672.
John Mar.26,1675.
Mehitable Sep.18,1678, died Jan.24,1678(9).

His land near the meeting house is mentioned in 1679, and in 1694 he was paid for ringing the bell at the meeting house. He was elected surveyor of highways "for the town" 1694 and in 1697 on a committee to seat or place persons at the meeting house. He was elected deacon sometime after 1679, date not known. On Feb.22,1711/12 John Bass & wife Elizabeth of Windham, Conn. sold to John Beale 1 acre, dwelling & barn, now in the occupation of Dea. Thomas Bass, father of said John Bass, with orchard & garden, N. & E. on the country road, W. on the "town buring place" , S. on land of Benjamin Savil & 2 acres etc. (S.D. 84-150).

This land occupied by Dea. Thomas Bass after his son removed to Conn. was at present corner of Hancock & Granite Sts., Quincy. After it's sale by his son John, Thomas & Susanna evidently went to Weymouth where she had lived before marrying him and they died there. Hence no need for a settlement of his estate.

S.D. 19-423: Thomas Bass, weaver, sold to Benjamin Tompson 1 ½ a. N. on town brook, E. on James Brackett, S. on town land adjoining the old school house, W. on the road. Jul.18,1700. Tompson reconveyed Nov.14,1700 to Benjamin Webb, S.D. 20-489.

Thomas Bass probably lived in Sherborn on the 40 acres granted to his father by the General Court Apr.26,1668 "in the right of Richard Stacy" lying north of Charles River, "near Nicholas Wood farm & Mr. Hull's".

[NI1641] Believed to be son of Humphery Bass by most Genealogist

This work has been graciously prepared by Mr. Frank Dyer. He has put in a lot of time and energy to this page. The information on these pages is from "Genealogies of the Familes of Braintree, Mass. 1640-1850" by Waldo Chamberlain Sprague. This is a micro film which has been transcribed to Word Perfect format, and the New England Historic Genealogical Society is soon to publish in CD format.

Frank E Dyer

Enfield, Ct. (member of NEHGS)

Home of "The New England Dyer Connection"

Web Site- http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4663

World Family Tree CD, Vol. 5, #1057

For those of you researching the northern Bass families, please contact him.

Dea. Samuel1 Bass

S.P. 13-539: Will of Samuel Bass of Braintry, dated May 11,1694:

To son John 10 a. salt marsh & a woodlot in Captain's Plain already set out to him & my malt house & orchard before it, ½ a well, ½ kitchen & some lands in Stoney Field he hath in his possession, ¼ of my upland in the Farme after paying legacies to my two daus. Mary Capen & Sarah Penniman & if there is any marsh after the 10 a. apiece given to my 3 sons, to be son John. To son Thomas 10 a. salt & a woodlot in Captain's Plain already laid out to him, ¼ of upland at the Farm. To son Joseph 10 a. salt valued at œ100, & the house he liveth in & orchard on the back side of it & fresh meadow at E. of it & a bed etc. he lieth upon at œ100 and my barne & 2 a. on which it sets reserving liberty for yard room & passage for son John to his barn, and 2 a. at head of the home lot, & 1 a. joining the 2 a. which was John Dassets, being part of a 5 a. lot, & ½ my kitchen & ½ well & 7 a. in Stoney Field where my cows use to pasture valued at œ100, and a woodlot already set out to him at Captain's Plain & stock, and moveables etc. at œ100 & ¼ upland at the Farme, & he is not to sell it away without the approbation of his two brothers & if he have children he may give it to them or if he have need to spend it, he may, for his own comfort & supply and if he marry a wife he may give her œ100 of it and the rest to any of his blood relations. 4thly. To Samuel Bass, carpenter, 7 a. pasture in Stony Field & salt he already has in possession & 1/4 part of upland in the Farm, also ½ the woodlot in Captain's Plain given my son Joseph & œ60 out of Joseph's estate if he have no children nor spend it. To Joseph Bass Jr. œ50 out of son Joseph's estate except he have children & spend it, & œ40 to my grandson Samuel Bass, cooper, out of Joseph's estate etc, all this after son Joseph's decease. To dau. Mary Capen œ40 & to dau. Sarah Penniman œ20 out of my upland at the farm & 5 cows. To John Bass Jr. my malt house if he out live his father & 2 a. planting land in Stoney Field & 4 a. pasture about ¼ a. at his door where barn stands. To my grand daus., excepting Sarah Biling all moveables goods & Hannah Walsbey is to share with them. All remainder of my estate to sons John & Thomas who are to be executors. Witness: Robert Field, William Thayer, Samuel Tompson.

S.P. 18-4 New Series - Witnesses swear to the will Jan.31,1694/5.

S.P. 13-541, Inventory of Samuel Bass who deceased 30 Dec.1694 apprized Jan.3,1694/5:

House & orchard behind it, fresh meadow at the end of it, with kitchen & well œ96.
Malt house & orchard before it etc. œ70.
Barn & 2 a. & 2 a. at head of lot & 1 a. bought of John Dosset & 7 a. in Stoney Field.
60 a. in Captain's Plain œ90.
6 a. in Stoney Field œ18
20 a. at ye Farm at ye 4 score acres
21 a. at ye Farm at Great Island
18 a. at ye Farm at the ox pasture
11 a. in 3 parcels at the farm
4 cows, 8 a. swamp
Total œ942/1/6

Taken by Samuel Tompson, Samuel Penniman, James Brackett Jan.31,1694(5).

Dea. Samuel1 Bass and wife and at least two children came to Massachusetts about 1631 or 32.

Samuel Basse was married to Anne Savell 25th April 1625 at St. Mary's Church, Saffron Walden, Co. Essex. His baptism is not on record there but that of Ann Savell is there in the parish register as were also two other children. Ann, daughter of William Savell was baptized 25th April 1601 at Saffron Walden. William Savell also had Elizabeth bapt. 10 Dec.1598 and Susan bapt. 4 June 1609. He also had a son William bapt. 24 Feb.1604/5 since the will of William of Braintree Mass. calls Deacon Samuel Bass his brother. (See Register Vol. 107-198).

Samuel Bass & wife were members of the church at Roxbury at an early date, probably by 1632 though no date is given. He is said to have settled near Hog Bridge there. He was made freeman of the colony May 14,1634.

He received no grant of land in Braintree and must have purchased of someone else. He came here previous to July 6,1640 at which time he was elected the first deacon of the church, having been dismissed and recommended to them from Roxbury (Hancock's Century Sermons, 1739 p.28). His homestead was at the N.W. corner of Granite and Hancock Sts., Quincy and parts of the land on Granite St. remained in the male line of descent until 1951 when Alva Morrison Bass died there single, a space of over 310 years. No records show how this land was acquired.

The Braintree records give the following account of his death: -

"Deacon Samuel Bass, aged 94 departed this life upon the 30th day of December, 1694, who had been a Deacon of the Church of Braintree for the space of above 50 years and the first Deacon of that church, and was the father and grandfather and great grandfather of a hundred and sixty and two children before he died, the youngest whereof was Benjamin Bas, son of Joseph Bas and Mary his wife born seven days before his death".

Mrs. Ann Bas, the wife of Deacon Samuel Bas, died the 5th of September 1693, aged 93. So says the town record but the ancient rough gravestone in Hancock Cemetery says Mrs. Ann Bass died 1692 aged 92.

He held numerous town offices, was selectman as early as 1642 and as late as 1673, many years not being recorded in the earliest records, and was Representative twelve years. He is recorded as selectman 1642,1645,8,51,52,53,1670,72, but the records are incomplete in early years.

Samuel Bass and son Thomas Bass both lived in Bogastow or Natick (now Sherborn) for some time in the 1660's as both signed the petition of the inhabitants there to be set up as a separate town May 7,1662 (Mass. Archives 112-136).

In 1672 he sold 140 acres there to John Hull, called himself of "Brantery, yeoman, and wife Ann did not sign the deed", she being aged and blind", says the deed. (S.D. 10-15).

Children of Dea. Samuel & Ann
Samuel bapt. May 11,1626 St. Mary's Ch. Saffron Walden, Co. Essex, England.
John bapt. Sep.18,1630 St. Mary's Ch. Saffron Walden, Co. Essex, England.
Ann bapt. Nov.25,1632 St. Mary's Ch. Saffron Walden, Co. Essex, England.
Mary born 1632, m. Sep.20,1647 (Register Vol.2 & Capen Gen.) Dea. John Capen of Dorchester as 2nd wife. She died Jun.29,1704 at Dorchester, in 73rd yr., gs. Old North Cem.
Hannah near 1633-4, m. 1st Nov.15,1651 at Braintree, Stephen Payne. m. 2nd Sep.14,1692 at Braintree, Shadrach Wilbur Sr. of Taunton as 2nd wife. She was alive April 1710 when mentioned in will of her brother Joseph Bass.
Joseph 163-, probably at Roxbury.
Ruth 163-, probably at Roxbury, m. Sep.24,1656 at Braintree, David Walesby, as 2nd wife.
Thomas 163- (before May 1635).
Sarah not Mary born Apr.26,1643 at Braintree (Boston Returns, as given in Register Vol.3 call her Mary) m. 1st about 1662, Dea. John2Stone of Watertown (Simon1) m. 2nd May 10,1693 at Braintree, Dea. Joseph Penniman. Rev. John Hancock in his "Century Sermons" delivered Sep.16,1739 (Published 1739, p.25-16) states in speaking of Dea. Bass that "Mrs. Sarah Penniman his youngest daughter and select of Deacon Penniman, and formerly wife of Deacon Stone of Watertown is now living among us, and was at our communion this day, in good health and of a sound mind. She was baptized in this church Apr.30,1643, received to communion May 4,1662. She is now at least in the 97 year of her life". This statement shows that Sarah, not Mary (who married in 1647) was the one born April 26, and baptized April 30,1643 in Braintree. Also from the notes of Rev. Mr. Hancock's two Sermons it appears that she was the first recorded child baptized by Rev. Henry Flynt, whose records commenced April 30,1643 (note on p.22) and ran to Mar.1,1667/8, but are now lost. How long she lived after Sep. 1639 is not known as there is no record of her death.

SAMUEL BASS AND WIFE ANNE ARRIVED ROXBURY MASS IN 1630,, THEN MOVED TO BRAINTREE MASS IN 1640 ( NOW QUINCY) SAMUEL WAS ELECTED THE FIRST DEACON OF BRAINTREE CHURCH6 JULY 1640.. SAMUEL WAS FATHER GRANDFATHER AND GREAT GRANDFATHER OF 162 PERSONS BEFORE HE DIED. REF:: POPE, PG 37 TORREY PG 50 LDS ANCESTRAL FILES, 1993; BASS FILES, AOL GENEALOGY BB. BAASS GEN PG 1-5 HILLS PT 2 PG 209, ENGLISH ORIGINS 1ST SERIES VOL 3 PG 179-81..

Also thought to be son of Benjamin Bass and Mary.

Notes for Deacon SAMUEL Bass, Sr:
Came to Roxbury in the colony of Mass about 1630 with wife and 1 or 2 children. Was a member of the first church there which gathered as early as 1632; became a freeman in 1634, but was dismissed by the church there in 7/5/1640. He moved to Braintree, became the first deacon there, serving for 50 years, and died at the age of 94. In Braintree, he represented the town in the legislature 12 years; he was an outstanding character. When he died he had 162 children, grand children and great grand children.

[NI1642] Parish Register Saffron Walden,co. Essex

[NI1696] He was a Frenchman but may have been born in Italy.

[NI1709] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #0626, Date of Import: Oct 25, 1996]

Cordwainer and farmer

[NI1715] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #0626, Date of Import: Oct 25, 1996]

Second President of the U. S. First VicePresident of the U. S.
Graduated from Harvard 1775
Admitted to Bar 6 Nov. 1758
Buried Quincy Congregational Church

[NI1722] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #0626, Date of Import: Oct 25, 1996]

Fought in Revolutionary War
1 son and 3 daughters - now extinct

[NI1724] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #0626, Date of Import: Oct 25, 1996]

Served in Revolutionary War
2 sons and 1 daughter

[NI1726] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #0626, Date of Import: Oct 25, 1996]

Aaron was her youngest son

[NI1727] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #0626, Date of Import: Oct 25, 1996]

Long line of issue

"Nabby"

[NI1730] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #0626, Date of Import: Oct 25, 1996]

Suicide or drowning

[NI1732] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #0626, Date of Import: Oct 25, 1996]

Member of Congress

[NI1735] Family legend holds that Cora died in or shortly after childbirth (of Clarence?).

[NI1736] Family legend states that after the death of Cora, Albert abandoned his son, leaving Clarence with relatives in the Kansas or Colorado area.

Dona Reed tells of a time when the family heard that someone who may have been Albert Reed was reported to be in Denver, Colorado. The family encouraged Clarence to establish contact with him, but Clarence rejected the notion with hostility.

[NI1880] [David Avery Hascall.ged]

Provided by: Mark K. Davis >

[NI1881] William and Ellen moved to the Foster Settlement, near New Germany, circa
1880.

[NI1894] Edward was named after the Evangalist, Edward Manning.

[NI1921] John removed to Boston at about 17 years of age and there he worked first for a furniture company and later as a teacher. From here he removed to New York City (Flatbush). Still later he returned to Boston and became a Motorman with the MTA.
John was very mechanically minded and learned the trade of a mechanic working for the Autocar Company building trucks. By this time he had four sons.
He removed, with his family, to Bear River, Nova Scotia in 1919-1920, where he operated his own garage. The family then moved to Bridgetown where John established the Bridgetown Livery Company. It was at this time that he joined forces with Hallett McLaughlin and they created Banks & McLaughlin, the first Crysler dealer in their area [now Everett & Smith Ltd.]. They were forced to disolve their partnership and business after the outbreak of the Second World War due to a critical shortage of spare parts.
John took his family to Dartmouth where he worked, for a time, with the Bell Bus Company and later for Silver's Boat Yark, constructing diving tenders.

[NI1923] Marion McCormick writes: Israel's first home was on the road to Lake
Jolly, a short way from his father's home and saw mill at the outlet of
Lake LeMarchant. The older children were born there but following the
death of Annie's father, John Frude, by a falling tree, in 1882, they
moved to his house on Sissiboo Road, about 1894. The children left
Morgantown School and attended Milford Corner School. They moved again a
couple of years later to live in the home of Annie's brother-in-law,
Ernest Kempton, and his first wife, Elizabeth Frude, near the generator
plant. They later lived on the Potter place on Sissiboo Road and after
one more move in Bear River they went to Rossway where the parents died.
They are burried in Mount Hope Cemetery with children Eva and Perry.

[NI1936] Donald Banks reports that his will would seem to indicate that he was
without issue by either wife. He left two
houses to Goldie F. Sweet, of Belmont, and the rest to his wife. Goldie
F. Sweet was the daughter of Enoch and Alma (Marshall) Sweet but was not
directly related to Amos.

[NI1944] Possibly Ambert vice Amherst?

[NI1946] Jacob made his home, for many years, on Falkland Ridge.

[NI2006] Wayne drowned on the Shannon
River in Annapolis County, Nova Scotia. The authorities
ruled the drowning accidental but the
family is not at all certain that this is entirely accurate.
Nannie Chase (his aunt Luella) says
Grampa Everett went to his grave suspecting foul play. It is
noted that his body was found
floating face up where drowning victims usually sink for a
few days. His nose was broken and
the family asks how indeed did he therefore drown? Also, his
glasses, which he always wore,
and required, were found in his car, safe and sound

[NI2213] [Notes by Dawn Banks]

I have some memories of "uncle Don" being a coin collector. Most of my visits with him tended to focus on collecting. He always encouraged me to start my own collection, often giving me coins.

Don had emphesema, but died of a bowel obstruction.

[NI2239] Jared lived in the United States from 1905 through 1915 before returning to work with his father at Rossway. He later purchased a home at Seabrook.

[NI2249] []

Most information concerning his children comes from Revolutionary War Pension Claim W 18148. It does not mention who the chidren married. In 1852 the only living children were Daniel, William, James and Isaac.

[NI2255] []

Records of the family from the family Bible in possession of Jennie Townsend Dunn (Mrs. Sherman) of Abingdon, Illinois.

[NI2273] Notes for William Safford Hascall (written by Richard Hascall)

The family removed from Galesburg, IL in a caravan of 25 wagons. Their daughter Mildred was born en route. They arrived in Banner county in 1888 and settled in the Redington area. They built a sod house. Daughter Millie recalls a story of airing her feather bed outdoors and finding a rattler as a bed partner later. Laura tells a story of Buffalo Bill stopping by and requested permission to water his horse. She recalls that he dipped his hat in the trough, let his horse drink from the hat, then proceeded to drink from the same hat.

[NI2290] Effie was living in Boston but returned to reside in Seabrook after her marriage. She was living with her daughter, Kathleen, since before 1965 and was reported, in 1975, as having 13 grand children and 20 great-grand children.

[NI2373] []

The facts given of William Henry Townsend and Mary Townsend Woodin were obtained (second-hand through another family member) from a booklet published in 1890 called "The Baldwins" compiled by N. A. Baldwin of Mt. Pleasant, Iowa.

[NI3324] Loren was the only child of his family to reside in Rossway.
RESEARCH NOTE: The Hines genealogy shows him as Lorne.

[NI3378] David Paul Banks writes:

The listing [of children] is incomplete. My dad married and had children by three wives. I am the oldest of ten kids.

[NI3381] This family was last reported to be resident near Yarmouth, Nova Scotia.

[NI3383] Ralph was single and was lost at sea when the gypsum boat S.S. Novadoc sunk enroute from Digby to Boston. Hilma Woods saw and spoke with Ralph just before he boarded the boat in Digby.

[NI3393] []

**Freeman in 1329
**Moved to Nollerton, York, England

[NI3394] []

**Freeman in 1349.
**Collector of Tolls and Taxes.

[NI3395] []

**Freeman in 1372.

[NI3398] []

**Freeman in 1419.

[NI3400] []

**Freeman in 1452.

[NI3408] []

**Came to Boston, America in 1636.

[NI3429] JOHN BASS WAS A WHEELWRIGHT ( REF; MAYFLOWER INC PG 5-6 TORREY PG 49 BASS GENEALOGY PG 9HILLS PART 2 PAGE 209-210 MAYFLOWER MARRIAGES PG 16.Genealogy Directory of New England Vol I A-C
per MAYFLOWER INCREASINGS by Susan E. Roser

This work has been graciously prepared by Mr. Frank Dyer. He has put in a lot of time and energy to this page. The information on these pages is from "Genealogies of the Familes of Braintree, Mass. 1640-1850" by Waldo Chamberlain Sprague. This is a micro film which has been transcribed to Word Perfect format, and the New England Historic Genealogical Society is soon to publish in CD format.

Frank E Dyer

Enfield, Ct. (member of NEHGS)

Home of "The New England Dyer Connection"

Web Site- http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4663

World Family Tree CD, Vol. 5, #1057

For those of you researching the northern Bass families, please contact him.



John2 (Samuel1) Bass
baptized Sep.18,1630, Saffron Walden Co. Essex, England. died Sep.12,1716 in 84th year. (sic) Married 1st Feb.3,1657, Ruth Alden, born about 1634-6, died Oct.12,1674, dau. of John & Priscilla (Mullins) Alden of Duxbury. married 2nd Sep.21,1675, Hannah Sturtevant of Plymouth, widow of Samuel, died - before Jun.1716, dau. of -. Ann (Hannah) wife of John Bass dismissed from Plymouth church Oct.30,1676 & admitted to full communion Dec.24,1676. He was a wheelwright. He was elected fenceviewer 1695, tithingman 1701, constable 1710 but refused it.

S.P. 19-202: Will of John Bass of Braintree, wheelwright, Jun.25,1716 - Oct.22,1716:

To son John who is to be executor 1 acre called calf pasture & all other estate not here disposed of to him for life, then to his son John or the next heir if he does not survive. To son Samuel all lands at Stand Brook in Salter's Farm, part of the four score acres & half my land at Rye Island (whole is 10 acres) on the N. side and a strap of land in the house lot in Salter's Farm near 2 a. of the plain lot as far as the fence goes etc. To son Joseph I have already given his full part and add 5/. To two daughters Mary Copeland & Sarah Thayer 1 acre each salt marsh for life, then to son John etc. and œ10 and the household moveables. To grand daughters that are children of my two deceased daughters Ruth & Hannah 10/ each, at age. To grandson John Bass a spot of land where he built a house, 1/2 my barn etc. Witness: Susanna Webb, Jonathan Webb, Benjamin Webb.

19-270 Inventory of John Bass Feb.11,1716 by Solomon Vesey, John Cleverly, Peter Adams:

14 acres in Captains Plain
10 a. in pasture & Stoney field
1 lot in the 600 acres
1 share in the Pine Swamp
10 a. at Rye Island
4 a. in the Farm

S.P. 8-326-7 New Series: Joseph Bass & Ephraim Thayer object to probate of will of John Bass 1716 & say he was insane and non - compos etc. Oct.22,1716. Several reasons given in petition.

Children of John & Ruth born at Braintree
John Nov.26,1658.
Samuel Mar.25,1660.
(?) Hannah Jan.28,1662 (sic)(Bra. VR 819) probably Ruth who m. about 1683, Peter Webb.
Joseph Dec.5,1665.
Hanna Jun.22,1667, m. 1688 as 2nd wife, Joseph Adams Jr.
Mary Feb.11,1669(70) m. 1st May 24,1686, Christopher Webb Jr., m. 2nd Apr. 13,1694, William Copeland, m. 3rd 1718, Ebenezer Spear.
Sarah Mar.29,1672, m. Jan.7,1691/2, Ephraim Thayer.

[NI3431] Joseph2 (Samuel1) Bass

born 163-, probably at Roxbury. died "about Jan.16,1714" (sic); 1714(5). married 1st, Mary -, born -, died "Mary wife of Joseph" Mar.15,1677/8, dau. of -. married 2nd (after 1694) Deborah -, born -, died (before Apr. 1710).

Joseph Bass in his will dated Apr.5,1710, gives his estate to his brothers and sisters, so had no wife or child living then. On Jul.22,1717 the selectmen voted to inquire about a legacy given by Joseph Bass deceased to Hannah Walesby. Joseph Bass "joyner" was elected tithingman 1705.

S.P. 18-447 Will of Joseph Bass Sr. dated Apr.5,1710
To brother John Bass Sr. œ10. To sister Hannah Wilbore œ5. To sister Sarah Penniman œ5. To kinsman Samuel Bass, carpenter, ½ my woodlot at the at the plain & other half divided between my cousin Joseph Adams Sr. & cousin Theophilus Curtis. To cousin Samuel Capen of Dorchester 40/. To kinsman John Bass of Lebanon 40/. To my loving friend James Freeman of Boston 30/. To friend Samuel Tompson 6/. To Hannah Walesby liberty to use the S. end of my dwelling house while unmarried and use that land I bought of John Dosset Sr. of Boston & 1 cow for her use & 1 barrel cyder & fire wood at her door, and if she go away or marry œ5 & a bed etc. All rest of estate ½ to cousin John Bass, drummer, and after him to his two eldest sons John & Samuel & other ½ to his brother Samuel Bass, deacon of the South Church in Braintree & after him his son Jonathan Bass. Executors my two cousins John Bass & Dea. Samuel Bass with brothers John & Thomas overseers. Witnesses: Samuel Tompson, Samuel Baxter, Bethiah Tompson.

S.P. 18-448 Inventory of Joseph Bass Feb.15,1714/5 by Joseph Allen, John Cleverly & Benj. Webb.

2 acres ..
House barn & 2 acres œ220/0/0
4 a. salt marsh
lands in Stoney field
other lands.

Child of Joseph & Deborah born at Braintree

Deborah bapt. Dec.22,1700, died before Apr. 1710.

[NI3445] Dea. Samuel3 (John2Samuel1) Bass

born Mar.25,1660. died Feb.20,1751 in 91st year, gs. East Bridgewater. married 1st, probably at Lynn, Ann Kirtland, born - 1638 at Lynn, died -, dau. of Nathaniel & -. married 2nd Nov.29,1689 (Ch.Rec.) at Braintree, Mercy Marsh, born Apr.2,1669, bapt. Sep.29,1672, died (before Mar.1697), dau. of Alexander & Mary (Belcher) Marsh. married 3rd, about 1693, Mary Adams, born Feb.25,1667/8, died Mar.9,1706, dau. of Joseph & Abigail (Baxter) Adams. She was not the Mary Adams who had married Samuel Webb as stated in many books. married 4th Oct.14,1706 at Boston, Bethiah Nightingale, bapt. Mar.21,1680, died -, dau. of William & Bethiah (Deering) Nightingale.

Samuel & Mary Bass were admitted to full communion at Braintree Sep.12,1697. He was a cooper and usually called Samuel Bass, cooper, to distinguish him from his cousin Samuel. He was in the Indian War 1675 and a grantee in 1735 of part of a Narraganset township for it. (Register 8-242; 16-144). He was elected fenceviewer for Monatiquot 1694,1699, hayward or field driver 1695, fenceviewer 1703, surveyor of highways 1696,1705, tithingman 1709,1710,1725, surveyor of highways 1727.

Child of Samuel & Ann born probably at Lynn
Ruth about 1685-8, m. intention Sep.6,1708 at Lynn, her cousin, Daniel Legaree of Braintree.

Children of Samuel & Mary born at Braintree
Jonathan bapt. Oct.3,1697.
Abigail bapt. Oct.3,1697, m. about 1715, John Wild Jr.
Mary bapt. Aug.14,1698, m. Apr.2,1720, William Bowditch.
Samuel Jul.26,1700 (bapt. Jun.30,1700 !).
Bethiah Feb.2,1704, m. Dec.7,1727 at Boston, William Torrey.
- child died Jan.11,1707/8 - Marshall's Diary.
Daniel probably about 1710, buried 1716 - Record of Samuel Niles, bur. Elm St. Cem.
Bathsheba bapt. Mar.29,1712 m. Feb.3,1731/2 Napthali Thayer, her cousin.

[NI3451] Samuel2 (Samuel1) Bass
baptized May 11,1626, Saffron Walden, in England. died before May 15,1653, the date of his inventory. married, Mary Howard, born (before 1639) 1629, died Oct.23,1691 at Dorchester, dau. of Robert & Mary ( - ) Howard of Dorchester and Boston. Robert Howard as notary public signed many documents. She married 2nd Apr.7,1659 at Dorchester, Isaac Jones. He was made freeman of the colony May 26,1647.

Samuel Bass Jr. died as a young man leaving an only son. His estate was given to widow Mary (who was to bring up the child) excepting the house and 5 acres that were to be leased by Samuel Bass Sr. And Robert Howard and they to pay her œ10, and this agreement was approved by the Magistrates Apr.23,1657. In petitioning for an adjustment on the inventory Robert Howard states his daughter came to his house in Dorchester to have her child. (Dorchester V.R. before 1657 were burned in that year.)

Children of Samuel Jr. & Mary born at Dorchester

Samuel near 1652.

S.P. 2-109 Inventory of Samuel Bass the younger, of Braintrey, yeoman 15 May 1653, taken by Capt. Humphrey Atherton, Dea. Wm. Parker, Richard Brackett, Francis Eliot, & Edmund Sheffield:

House, barn & orchard & 5 acres, 2 in tillage, 7 in wheat, land at the neck purchased of Martin Saunders œ201/18/5. Widow Mary deposed & relinquished her dower, & the whole estate to be divided between mother and child, & Mr. Howard in behalf of his daughter to give the child half the estate at age 14.

S.P. 3-68: Abatement of the inventory - a long & detailed account of cattle & utensils etc. mentions his Scott (Scotch indentured servant), his wife and son, the wife went to Dorchester to her father's house for 13 weeks for lying in when the child was born etc. The whole estate to be the widows but Dea. Bass & Robert Howard are to lease the house & 5 acres, and the mother to bring up the child and receive œ7 rent. The magistrates approve the agreement making the rent œ10, Apr.23,1657.]

DIED SMALL POX.. WIFE RE-MARRIED.

[NI3456] Joseph3 (John2 Samuel1) Bass

born Dec.5,1665. died Nov.22,1733 a. 68 (Fam. Rec.) married 1st Jun.5,1688, Mary Belcher, born Sep.8,1668, died Nov.2,1707 (a. about 40- Marshall's Diary), dau. of Moses & Mary (Nash) Belcher. married 2nd Feb.23, 1708, Lois Rogers. She was widow of Ezekiel Rogers & of Samuel Blye. She was born Feb.7,1660(1) at Lynn, died. (alive 1734), dau. of Thomas & Mary (Davis) Ivory of Lynn. She married 1st Dec.19,1678 at Lynn, Samuel Blye, m. 2nd Sep.20,1694 at Lynn, Ezekiel Rogers.

Joseph Bass Jr. & Mary Bass were admitted to full communion Jul.27,1690. Joseph Bass was dismissed to the New South Church, Boston Jun.27,1720 and resided in Boston where he removed previous to 1711. He was a brewer. He was elected fence viewer 1693 for "Stony Field" and 1694 for "The Town" (Quincy), constable 1696, fence viewer 1704, town treasurer 1708,1709.

S.P. 32-59: Petition of Alden Bass of Boston, wharfinger, to Governor & Council Feb.25,1733(4) that his father Joseph Bass made a will latter end of October last and devised to Alden his dwelling house reserving to his wife one chamber, a privilege in the garret and cellar and the stuff in the chamber during her widowhood and he to pay her œ10 per annum, to son Joseph a piece of land between Mr. Keyes & his son Moses, and to each of his children œ50 and Alden was told to hold a certain wharf and the mortgage to his father of œ400, there being 7 children including the petitioner. To his son Benjamin his wearing apparel. To son Moses land behind his brew house. To dau. Miller a silver cup, and to sons Joseph & Alden rest of the moveables & they to be executors, and that he died a month later and two days afterwards the will was read to the whole family and taken from a trunk before funeral and read again to some of the family but when they went to get it to go to probate it was missing and eldest son Joseph was made administrator.

Jun.25,1734 a committee appointed by the Legislature sent for the widow and children and two witnesses all and separately and all agreed as to the will and that someone had secreted it etc, that the witnesses had witnessed it Sep.22, last, etc., and that it ought to be allowed and not forfeited so as not to encourage such behavior. The committee recommended Sep.14,1734 that it should be a testate estate and not go as an intestate estate, and is so entered in the files of probate.

Children of Joseph & Mary born at Braintree

Mary Jun.22,1690, m. Sep.27,1716 at Boston, John Miller.
Joseph Jul.5,1692.
Benjamin Dec.19,1694, Grad. at Harvard Coll. 1715. Ordained at Hanover Dec.11,1728 & died there May 23,1756 a. 61. He was at Newport, R.I. in 1724.
Moses Oct.23,1696.
Ruth Mar.21,1699, m. Mar.21,1722/3 at Dorchester, Samuel Trott. "Ruth of Boston".
John Jan.19,1702 (bapt. Jan.25,1701/2), died Jan.31,1702 a. 12ds., gs. Hancock Cem., Quincy.
Elizabeth Feb.2,1703(3)(2)?, (bapt. Feb.7,1702 (1702/3 Ch.Rec.), m. Mar. 30, 1724 at Boston, Daniel Henshaw.
Alden Oct.28,1705 (Oct.21, Family Rec.)

A family record of ages and deaths of grandfather Joseph Bass, his wife Mary, and of the children from a bible of Uncle Daniel Henshaw of Leicester, 1779 is now at the N.E. Hist. Gen. Society, Boston. From it, the deaths of the parents and children above are given. The daughters, Mary Miller, died Oct.1760 in 51st yr., Ruth Trott died Jan.16,1752 in 52nd yr., Elizabeth Henshaw died Oct.17,1774 a. 70-8-4, and the sons are given in their proper place on the cards. Bass 356

[NI3462] Samuel3 (Samuel2-1) Bass

born near 1652. died Oct.15,1732. married Jul.30,1678, Rebecca Faxon, born Jun.25,1657, died - (before Nov. 1726), dau. of Thomas & Deborah (Thayer) Faxon.

He was made freeman of the colony May 6,1685. Samuel Bass owned the covenant before 1683 and his wife Rebecca was admitted to full communion Nov.2,1684 and he on Apr.12,1685. He was called Samuel Bass "carpenter", to distinguish from his cousin Samuel, "cooper". He was fenceviewer for Stony Field 1693, tithingman 1698, 1704, 1710, constable 1709 but refused to serve, and again elected 1729.

Children of Samuel & Rebecca

born at Braintree
Deborah Oct.5,1679 m. Nov.29,1699 Joseph Webb.
Samuel Dec.8,1681, died soon.
Samuel Mar.26,1684.
David Nov.15,1686.
Rebecca May 24,1689, single in Oct. 1726. She married 1st Jul.24,1735 at Boston, John Dassett as 2nd wife. m. 2nd int. May 23,1751 at Boston, James Beighton.
Mary Dec.27,1691 (bapt. Dec.20 !) m. - Hastings.
Sarah bapt. Jul.29,1694, m. Jan.6,1736/7, Dea. Samuel Savil as 3rd wife.
Seth bapt. Jun.20,1697.
Nathan bapt. Jun.30,1700, died "Sam Bass child" Sep.15,1700- Marshall's Diary.
Anna Feb.21,1702, m. as "Hannah" May 11,1721, William Moss (or Morse) of Watertown & Cambridge.
Enoch Apr.18,1704, died Feb.26,1707.

S.P. 31-153: Will of Samuel Bass "being aged & full of days" dated Oct.31,1726 - proved Oct.30,1732:
To son Samuel besides what already given by deed of gift a single share in 6th lot in Cochato in a ten acre lot as also a fourth lot, in said Cochato. To son David besides what already given by deed of gift ½ the cedar swamp, the 2 acre lot, & my further woodlot containing 6 or 7 acres in the 600 acres adjoining land of John Quincy Esq. on the northerly side & half the woodlot being about 25 acres in whole lot near Bear's Swamp where he has built a house. To son Seth besides what already given by deed of gift the west end of my dwelling house, ½ the cellar, ½ barn & hither most woodlot in the 600 acres & other half of the cedar swamp lot being 1 acre, & other half the woodlot lying by Bear Swamp.

To dau. Deborah Webb œ10. To dau. Mary Hastings œ10. To dau. Anna Moss œ10 besides what they had already near œ50 apiece. To five daus. Rebecca Bass, Sarah Bass to have œ20 apiece besides their share of the moveables and to have a good cow of their own and improvement of E. end of the house ½ the cellar & barn and about 3 acres during their single life bounded N.W. on the country road, N.E. on 2 a. son David received of me, S.E. on land of John Beall & Mehitable Fisher, S. on my own pasture and œ30 each when they marry paid by son Seth. To my own sons my clothes etc. Sons Samuel, David, & Seth executors. Witness: Wm. Hayden, Abigail Adams, Joseph Parmenter.
Abigail Adams deceased before probate of will.

[NI3485] [Notes by Everett P. Inman]

His will was probated 29 Mar 1664. He came to MA in the Confidence on 11 Apr 1638. Settled in Salisbury; he moved to Newbury.

[NI3594] "William(1) Savil, who was first of record in Cambridge, Mass., in 1641 and who settled in Braintree in 1642, in his will dated 19 Feb. 1668[9], mentions his brother Bass and makes "my brother Samuel Bass" one of the executors of his will. His own baptism is not apparent in Saffron Walden; Ann Savil, daughter of William, baptized there 26 April 1601, was no doubt his sister and wife of "his brother Samuel Bass"." *
Research: e-mail from Tom Morris to Debbue Krupke, *NEHGR, Vol.107, July 1953, pps. 218-220

[NI3617] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 3, Ed. 1, Tree #1898, Date of Import: Feb 4, 1998]

Children of Charles Henry Fitzgerald & Mary Elizabeth Fiske:
{Minnie Lizzie}
Amos Harold Fitzgerald 3 July 1881 m. Belle Kinsman d.14 Oct 1969 VR
Winthrop Fiske Fitzgerald 4 Feb 1887 d. 26 Dec 1903 VR
Justin Filmore Fitzgerald 20 Nov 1890 m. Blanche A. Smith d. 12 Feb 1956
Charles Randolph Fitzgerald * 23 Oct 1893 m. Dorothy Sargent d 17 Nov 1966 VR

[NI3618] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 3, Ed. 1, Tree #1898, Date of Import: Feb 4, 1998]

Children of Charles R.Fitzgerald & Dorothy Sargent:

Dorothy Eleanore Fitzgerald 9 Oct 1921 m. Thornton Cushman Gay
Winthrop Sargent Fitzgerald 19 Dec 1924 m. Elsie May Goode
Carl Randolph Fitzgerald 18 Jan 1930 m. June Marilyn Henderson

All born in Lowell, MA VR

[NI3624] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 3, Ed. 1, Tree #1898, Date of Import: Feb 4, 1998]

Children of Winthrop S. Fitzgerald & Elsie M. Goode:

Marc Winthrop Fitzgerald m. Diane Marie Tricone 9 June 1990

Gayle Elise Fitzgerald m. Mahmoud A. Ismaiel 13 Mar 1994
No. Tewksbury, MA

[NI3633] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 3, Ed. 1, Tree #1898, Date of Import: Feb 4, 1998]

Children of R.A.L.Fitzgerald & Mary Clark:

George Edward Fitzgerald 24 Feb 1843 m. Clara R. Bailey
Henrietta Fitzgerald 25 Mar 1845 d. 13 Jan 1849 Medford, MA VR
{Scarlet Fever}
Frank Fitzgerald 1850 m. Julia Bailey, she lived to be 100, d. 1950
Charles Henry Fitzgerald* 2 May 1854 m. Mary Elizabeth Fiske
d. 20 June 1929
I knew Grandpa Fitz a little, he lived with Kenny's family for awhile.
I knew Aunt Julia, she lived with a daughter in Sudbury, MA and we often
went to visit, she was also an aunt to our next door neighbor, Louise
Trull. She had 2 daughters, Leona Perkins and Grace Brackett who lived in
New Haven, CT. Have lost track of their children.

[NI3637] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 3, Ed. 1, Tree #1898, Date of Import: Feb 4, 1998]

Children:
Olive 13 June 1816 m. Ezra Fowler
Emily Bonney 23 Sep 1817 m. James Leavitt Meservey d. 23 Nov 1880 CA
Randolph Augustus Lawrence 17 May 1819 m. Mary Clark {cousin}
George Little 28 May 1822 m. Letitia Miller
May no data lived in Lawrence, MA
Charlotte McKusick Apr 1829 m. Francis W. Cross d. 19 Sep 1856
Lucinda 1831 d. 25 Aug 1871
Mary 1833 m. W.J.Howland

[NI3649] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 3, Ed. 1, Tree #1898, Date of Import: Feb 4, 1998]

Children of Zebediah McKusick & Charlotte Agnes Tarbox:

William McKusick 1787 m. Polly Keen d. 13 Mar 1858
Betsey McKusick 5 Sept 1789 m. Joseph Johnson
Mary McKusick * 1792 m. Joshua Clark 18 Apr 1817 d. 1841
Olive McKusick * 1793 m. Michael Fitzgerald 7 Aug 1814 d.17 Sep 1882
Lucinda McKusick m. Joseph Hill
Nahum Forrest McKusick 1802 m. Sarah Gordon {1st. wife}
Charlotte A. McKusick 1810 m. Joseph Drew III 23 June 1833 d. 7 Dec 1893

[NI3652] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 3, Ed. 1, Tree #1898, Date of Import: Feb 4, 1998]

Children of Joshua Clark & Mary McKusick:

Daniel Clark no data
John Clark m. Mary Coburn
Mary McKusick * 26 Aug 1819 m. Randolph A.L.Fitzgerald
Hannah Clark m. ? Morey
Harriet Clark m. ? Small

[NI3660] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 3, Ed. 1, Tree #1898, Date of Import: Feb 4, 1998]


Children of Matthew McKusick & Mary Bettis:
Zebediah McKusick * June 1763 m. Charlotte Agnes Tarbox d. 28 Feb 1847
Hezekiah McKusick circa 1768 d. 18 Mar 1829
Aaron McKusick m. Mary Means 18 Nov 1808
Olive McKusick circa 1770 m. Nathaniel Cousins Jr.
Salome {Sarah,Sally,} circa 1774 m. Nathaniel Cousins Sr.
Eunice {Emmie} McKusick circa 1767 d, unm. 19 Jan 1838
Martha {Patty} McKusick circa 1777 m. Jotham Stevens
Annie {Anna} McKusick ca 1779 m. Abner Cousins ca, 1798 d. 11 Aug 1816
Moses McKusick no data

Matthew McKusick was a Cpl. in Biddeford 1st. Co. Revolutionary War.

[NI3666] [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 3, Ed. 1, Tree #1898, Date of Import: Feb 4, 1998]

Children of Francis Bettis & Mary Banks:

Mary Bettis * b. 1742 m. Matthew McKusick d. 28 Mar 1829
Lydia Bettis b. 16 Jan 1747/48 m. John McKusick 3 Nov 1768

[NI3667] RESEARCH NOTE: Robert T. Banks, of Timmins Ontario, reports that Merna McClenathen, of California, has considerable information on this family line and may be willing to include same within this genealogy. I have since contacted Merna and she is, indeed, willing to pass on her information. [Eakins]

[Notes by Everett P. Inman]

Mary Banks Bettis joined 1st Congregational Church, Biddeford, from Methodist Church,York on 30 Nov 1762. Marriage intentions with Ebenezer Hill were recorded on 20 Jan 1771.

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[NI3901] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Eliza was cared for in her declining years by a nephew on the Banks Homestead on the Nicholsville Rd., south of Aylesford, now [1993] occupied by Howard Beals.

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[NI4088] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Clark never had a second name so he adopted "Rand" for his own purposes.

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[NI4113] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

RESEARCH NOTE: There is a grave stone in the Greenwood Union Cemetery that has a birth date but no death date -- is this our Milford and if not, where was he buried?

RESEARCH NOTE: Rev. Edward WHeelock believes he married a Miss Spinney, lived in Tremont and had five or six children. (Could the Reverend be thinking of Milford Banks, son of Reginald and Kathleen (Annis) Banks?)

[NI4115] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Zenas and Effie came to Calgary in 1912 from Nova Scotia. They were there for five or six years and then got a farm at "Nose Hills", supposedly of 1000 acres. It seems that every large farm or ranch was 1000 acres. Zenas worked as a blacksmith in Nova Scotia and as a carpenter in Calgary, Alberta before taking up farming. I think he also worked in a realtor's office as a salesman for a period of time. [Charles Whitney Banks]

[NI4118] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Francis Nixon has an Anah Banks married to Palis Long and having a daughter, Grace Aurora Banks, born 24 October 1886. They also adopted Zachariah and Matilda Banks. Is this our Anah Banks? Her note shows a Gary Long - who is this gentleman and what is his relationship to Palis Long?

[NI4186] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Lloyd was last reported to be resident at 199 Everett Street, Middleboro, MA 02346.

[NI4187] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Harley was last reported to be resident in California.

[NI4197] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Merle was killed in action during the Second Great War while serving with the Royal Canadian Navy

[NI4201] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Jack was killed in action during the Second Great War while serving with the Royal Canadian Air Force

[NI4217] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Alfred was a farmer and lumberman and they resided in Harmony, Kings County, Nova Scotia. He was interested in church activities and music. Some records show a death date of 1958 but Barb (Tuttle) Walker notes that Alfred was still alived when they moved here, ca 1957.

It is interesting to note that his wives were related, with at least four common ancestors. They were second cousins through Timothy and Margaret (Bass) Banks, and half third cousins through the two wives of Moses Banks.

[NI4244] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Ellen drowned after falling into a well.

[NI4247] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Robert was a Borden at birth, but was raised as a Banks.

[NI4253] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Ned attended Acadia University and later joined the Royal Canadian Navy; retiring at the end of the war, in 1945. He graduated from Dalhousie University in 1950 and has practiced dentistry in Shelburne, NS and Whitehorse, Yukon Territory.

[NI4265] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Donald Banks, the Maine historian, noted that Bruce was living in Boston in 1974, and was the first to provide information on the line of Ingram C. Banks (son of Joseph) and on several other Maine Banks lines.

[NI4283] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Diane is very much interested in the Banks family genealogy and provided much of the information on the family of Howard Stanley Banks.

[NI4314] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Viola has her home in Largo, FL, but spends her summers in Waltham, MA with her daughter.

[NI4373] [Notes by Jum Eakins]

John was an illegitimate son and was raised by his grand parents, Oakley and Pearl (Wiswall) Banks. His natural father has never been determined.

He was the Acting First Mate on the fishing vessel "Reliance", out of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia. The ship was bound for Shelburne from Lunenburg when it was struck by a freighter of Liberian registry. The "Reliance" was sliced in two and went down with little warning.

He married Greta Joyce Lantz, daughter of Everett Elwood Ernest Lantz and Ella Violett Redden, 18 Nov 1954, in Dartmouth, Halifax CO, NS183. Born, 21 Sep 1937, in Berwick, Kings CO, NS599.

Joyce was first married to John Peter Banks; second to Edwin Maurice Banks; and, lastly, to Stanley Vidito. Joyce and Stanley presently [1992] reside in Brickton, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia where Joyce is in ill health. I recently had the pleasure of meeting Joyce and am pleased to report that she is a lady with a refreshing zest for life.

[NI4404] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Charles Whitney Banks writes: Walter Drohan is a potter, now organizing (1974) the Calgary branch of the Alberta University School of Fine arts. He is widely regarded as an excellent potter and has some of his works in permanent deposit with the National Treasury of Fine Arts. I have a vase of his that is indeed quite remarkable.

[NI4466] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Kimberley attended Middleton Regional High School and was a good friend of Jimmy Eakins, the son of this writer, and is his 6th cousing 1 time removed. Kimberley was attending Holland College, PEI (clothing design) and is presently (1993) attending Ryerson Ploytechynic University in Toronto, ON where she is taking fashion merchandising.

[NF0038] From notes by Wilhelmina Wadell Winkler and Joan Gordon

THE TIME IN LAKE CITY,MN

After they were married, they moved to lake city, and Grandpa worked for Mrs Wenzel in her bakery. We used to visit her and her son at the bakery as late as the late thirties. I remember Mrs Wenzel a a formidable presence who, on a Sunday afternoon, would wear a ribbon around her throat, and might offer us a dish of ice cream in her barn like restaurant. I was always glan to head over to the lake, and I think Grandma felt that way about her too.

The three oldest children- John, Anna & Freddie-were born there. Freddie died before he was two. Mother remembered his funeral, but we never could find his grave.Those cemetary visits were always interesting because Lake City, being a river town, had many markers in the shape of ancors and tree trunks.

The stories I heard most often about Lake City were about terrible storms that came in from Lake Pepin, Both in the summer & winter. In the winter Grandpa liked to go out on the lakeon boats that "sailed " on the ice with wind driven sails.

I think Grandma was glad to leave Lake City to go to Shullsburg, Wisc.

SHULLSBURG, WISC.

I don't know how Grandpa decided on Shullsburg. It was a mixture of mining engineers, miners & farmers. The family lived over the bakery, so they saw all types. The younger children were born there and mother finished the eight grade there.

Most of the stories I heard related to Lizzie Wetherby. She was the daughter of the mining engineer, and lived in a big house full of many Victorian artifacts. The story was that when her family did not allow her to marry the man she wanted she went to bed for 20 yrs. By then she was poor. I think Grandma saw that she had enough food. She also gave many things to Grandma, so we had books, music, a plate or two and such. The story was she had a log that Lincoln split, and a set of dishes from which Pres Grant ate. I used to wonder if we had the plate, but we didn't. He lived in Galena, Ill which wasn't too far away She would thae the girsl out riding in her carrage. Grandma bought our black piano from her for mother. Mother and Grandma spent time at her house and always had stories to tell.

Somehow they also knew Mrs Harris. She was the engineer's wife. Eventually she worked and wrote for the Kansas City Star. Aunt Susie (your Grandma, Dawn) & Grandma kept in touch with her and she was something of what we would now call a role model for us.

When mother and I visited Shullsburg in the early forties, we visted the hotel there. Someone told us that Mrs Harris stayed there and that was how they got to know her. Aw also found Lizzie's grave. It said that she was born in 1832, but didn' give a date of death. On the same trip, we visited one of mother's cousins, John hammerli in Madison. I think he was the son of one of Grandma's sisters who didn't come to the US. One of his sons went back to Switzerland and I think Jennie and Julia found him.

PINE ISLAND
By the time the family moved to Pine Island, mother (Anna) had to take more responsibility for the younger girls. Everyone worked in the store , but grandma was less well, and the responsibility was on mother. After grandpa retired and we grand children came along, I got to spend more time with grandma and that is how I learned some of these stories.

One of the stories about grandpa was that if someone came into the store to sell him something like stock in a gold mine, he would say that he had to check the oven, then he would run out the back door, go across the street to the bank for advice, and return by the back door. Another was of his going to the barber shop for a shave, he never shaved himself, remembering his bread, and running down the street with the barber's cloth still died around his neck.

Even after he had sold the shop he would sometime help out in the pool hall. We weren't allowed into the pool hall, so we had to rap on the window until he came out. Mother would tell the story of his going into a saloon, and have them wait outside. But one day he came out very pleased; he had discovered the ladies' entrance, and the girls could come in there.

He liked to help out people and probably following the pattern he followed when he was young, he would bring in young fellows to help out. The last time Mother and I visited the old bakery was with Bert Bunn, who had worked for Grandpa when he was young. We Dug around the backroom where the ovens
used to be and down in cellar. We didn't find anything that we could keep but we looked.

Other stories were about people ( & store) The constable who kept his cigars in his helmet. The banker who always bought a nickel's worth of chocolate haystacks & ended up in prison when his bank failed in the 20's. The priest who had several country parishes including Cherry Grove & would come in Saturday night after he had made the rounds. Wiping up the counter after people set their babies on them while they bought their bread. That was when we all learned to be nice to and to enjoy everyone.

On Saturday night, the farmers would exchange eggs for "due bills." They could take these to the other stores and buy groceries and dry goods. The other place I would hear stories was sitting in the parked car on Main street on band concert niights (* personal note from me, dad. I remember sitting in the car on those band concert nights and the man name Stukey who sold the best buttered popcorn from his wagon for a nickel). Grandma had stories about everyone that came down the street. Charles Ives Symphonies always remind me of those nights.

Another place was on Sunday afternoon rides. I remember, when we would be up in the Berne Swiss area ( a place in MN) , she would point out every goat and try to get Dad to get her some milk or cheese. He would point how dirty the farm was, the regular herds were fine. ( Dad, her father, Managed the Land o Lakes creamry in Pine Island). I thot of that the other nite when I had goat cheese on my pizza.

Because it is Christmas Eve Day, 1992, I can say that our speciality was oyster stew. Grandpa sold lots of oyster stew and oyster crackers. Oysters must have been much more available even in Shullsburg. He always said to heat them just enough so that the oysters started to turn over. We also made scalloped oysters for Christmas dinner.

Grandpa also made doughnuts. He did not trust hot lard on the stove when the children were around. I had been known to tip my trike onto the cookstove and to bounce a ball in to the torte. I also could not be trusted to arrive home with the same number with which I left Grandma's.

Another time I heard stories was on Sunday afternoons when I would help her write Sunday letters. She could do it herself, But I think we both enjoyed the company. She collected old spellers from school and her dictionary had lots of words written in the front and she had lots of books--So as I say it was for the company that she let write the letters. (Another personal note from me, dad. This may refer to the fact that my gramdparents spoke German & Joan was so academically gifted. When I was about 5 or so and was staying with my grandparents I cried cause I couldn't understanding what they were saying to each other...they felt bad & never spoke German in front of me again)

So I could go on. I'm sure others in the family have other memories, and maybe remember the same thing differently-- I know I used to hear several versions as I sat on the back porch while Grandma & Auntie were making rugs, but that is the way it is.

This is the end of Joan's Narative below are the two obituaries. Note that grandma died a couple months after grandpa I think she just missed him.

[NF0039] Joseph and Dorothy were both of Wilmot and were second cousins.

[NF0041] Alexander and Ada are 3rd cousins, through Joshua and Mary (Muchmore) Banks; 6th cousins, through John and Ruth (Alden) Bass; and half-2nd cousins, through Moses Banks and his two wives, Jane Spinney and Judith Saunders.

[NF0043] Timothy and Margaret were resident in Aylesford, Kings County, Nova Scotia.
RESEARCH NOTE: Was there another son, Timothy, born 1814, who removed to New Brunswick, in 1838? Check 1851 Census for Sunbury County, New Brunswick.

[NF0054] I can't find anything to support this marriage. I have found that Moses Belcher was married to someone named "Mary." I have found elsewhere (Automated Ancestries Family Pedigrees) a Moses Belcher, living in the right place (Braintree, MA), married to someone named Mary, at about the right time. For now, I'm including both this marriage to Mary Nash, and the ancestry for Moses Belcher.

[NF0059] RESEARCH NOTE: There is much confusion regarding this family: more than any other in the Genealogy as even the date of their marriage is in doubt. Most of the authorities record the marriage as 18 September 1737 (Chute Genealogy), while others give 4 July 1737, with the officiating minister being Reverend Samuel Moody. The Chute genealogy records them as Loyalists, which is impossible, since they arrived in 1760, with the only known connection to the Loyalists being the fact that their son, Joseph, apparently returned to the United States and fought for the Loyalists. Most records state that they had a large family, five of whom came to Nova Scotia. However, later information has come to hand, indicating that Joshua and Mary came in 1760, bringing all of their surviving children. Joshua is said to have owned land in Allain’s Creek, which he sold to Judah Rice on the 11th of May of 1770. The first home of Moses would appear to have been in Granville. He and his brother, Joshua, later moving to Wilmot. The worst dispute is regarding the birth dates of the children, although the Baptismal dates should not be in dispute since they are recorded in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register. However, the first baptism was 13 years after the marriage, and if their son Moses was baptized as an infant, he married at age 6 years! Possibly Moses, being the eldest was baptized as an adult, and since they are said to have "had a large family" several may have died before the later baptisms. In fact, to add further to the confusion the birth dates of others are given as exactly ten years before the baptisms, and it is not reasonable to suppose that any family would have all their children baptized on their tenth birthday. In the case of Moses, one must presume that he was baptized aged 20, and that the ages of the others are unknown. [Marion McCormick]

[NF0105] Mr. Harmon became the sole heir to that part of the Boynthon Patent which fell to the wife of Cummings. The daughter Elizabeth, an only child of John Harmon and his wife Elizabeth, married Joseph Banks of York, to which place Harmon removed before 1690. Banks thus acquired Harmon's right, but in 1714 conveyed one half of it to Peter Weare and others. John Harmon and Thomas Cummings were the administrators of the estate of Richard CUmmings, who died about 1676. Thomas did not long survive his father. John Harmon was sent by Saco, as Deputy to the Assembly in 1681.

[NF0109] Tabitha and Samuel were of York, Maine and were the great grandparents of the poet Longfellow.

[NF0144] James and Rachel lived in Port Medway, Nova Scotia.

[NF0157] John and Elizabeth lived in or near Annapolis, Annapolis County, NS.

[NF0161] Mary and Ezra resided south of Annapolis, Annapolis County, NS

[NF0174] Elizabeth and Nehamiah were living in Vermont but later removed to Lebanon, Connecticut where they were listed, in 1738, with eight children.

[NF0183] Branch and Sarah came to Kings County, Nova Scotia. He was a Cornwallis grantee, receiving his grant in 1764. About 1771 he sold at least part of his land ["lying on the road to Stephen Chase’s mills."] to Judah Wells, and returned to Plymouth, Massachusetts, from which place he came.

[NF0185] John McMichael and Lucy Lillie Dayton were married 26 February 1879 by Samuel Jones, M.E. Church, Perry, Iowa. They moved to eastern Nebraska, 1885, and then to Lincoln county, NE. in 1887. Children Pearl, Eva and Edward were born in Iowa. Lorena was born in Verdin, NE and Mertie in Lincoln County, NE -- near Wellfleet.

[NF0189] Zebediah and Abigail lived in York, Maine and were said to have had thirteen sons.

[NF0231] RESEARCH NOTE: Robert T. Banks was reported to have a marriage record, date 17 Oct 1776. I have been unable to verify as at this date.

[NF1394] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

James and Ermina lived in Upper Granville, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia and were without issue.

[NF1484] [Notes by Jim Eakins]

Wilfred and Ardith are 4th cousins through Moses and Judith (Saunders) Banks

RESEARCH NOTE: I had a most enjoyable but short visit with Ardith and Wilfred, and two of their sons on 23 jul 93 where much information was passed along for the genealogy.

[NF1553] According to Nancy Schott, Mary and Samuel had 8 children.

[NS09881] Customer pedigree.

[NS369461] Customer pedigree.

[NS10951] Customer pedigree.

[NS396801] Customer pedigree.

[NS397331] Customer pedigree.

[NS11021] Customer pedigree.

[NS372031] Customer pedigree.

[NS365501] Customer pedigree.

[NS216501] Customer pedigree.

[NS380681] 6128 Weobley Lane, Raleigh, NC 27614 (919) 848-2115, November, 1995

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